Kale, Leeks, and Chicken

kale, leeks, and chicken

A friend from my church has a very large garden; sharing its bounty is her joy.  Last summer’s series on simplified kale receipts was inspired by her gracious contributions (see 2016/09/07 & 2016/09/19).

My mind creates recipes according to what is in my larder, which usually boasts of provision supplied by church members.  Lately Goldie has been bringing her organic kale again, as well as leeks and celery; this mouth-watering chicken dish resulted.

For a wedding present last year, I gave a marriage supper, complete with a cooking class, to newlyweds in our congregation (see Thai Coconut Lime Flounder, 2016/12/05); my desire was to release the gift of excellent nutrition in them.  Several weeks ago, we celebrated their holy matrimony again, with a new set of instructions and dinner following, rejoicing over God’s goodness in our lives.

Dina exhibited such courage in overcoming her unfamiliarity with food preparation, the first time I coached her; hope, however, grew this recent session, for she has grown exponentially in her eager steadfastness in the kitchen.

This new teaching included my chicken dish using the kale, shallots, and leeks from our church; these steps are straightforward, though they are time-consuming, with the preparation of leeks and kale.  But oh the benefits of health and taste!

Leeks are one of the world’s oldest vegetables, which are more delicate in flavor than either onions or shallots; they are considered highly nutritious, with cancer fighting attributes, as well as antiseptic, laxative, and diuretic properties, among many other health-promoting values.  This vegetable is particularly strong in vitamins K and A (when eaten raw, one 3.5-ounce serving contains 52 % daily requirement of vitamin K and more than 29% that of vitamin A).  Though research on this particular Allium is hitherto limited, it can well be assumed that its health benefits are comparable to those proven in its closely related onion and garlic cousins.  Its notable amount of flavonol kaempferol, in its substantial polyphenol content, thereby combats many health problems related to oxidative stress and chronic low-level inflammation; among these are rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, and type 2 diabetes; thus, this recipe is beneficial to Dina, whose husband is presently overcoming diabetes.  For an additional recipe and more on its history, go to Zucchini Chicken with Leeks and Shallots (2017/09/28).

Enjoy making today’s clear, detailed chicken recipe for leeks, shallots, and kale; my next entry will expound on the colorful history of leeks, with a delectable soup (2017/09/18).  Note: I will be taking this coming week off due to our Women’s Advance-we always advance, we never retreat, at Abundant Life Family Church (alfc.net)!

References:

www.foodfacts.mercola.com/leeks.html

www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=26

www.historic-uk.com/HistoryofWales/TheLeek-National-emblem-of-the-Welsh/

finished product

Kale, Leeks, and Chicken  Yields: 5-6 servings.  Total prep time: 1 1/2 hr (lengthy, but well worth it with these simple, detailed directions).

1 1/2 pound chicken tenderloins, about 8-10 large pieces  (Natural is best; available reasonably in Trader Joe’s freezer.)

2 large carrots, optional

3 large stalks of celery

1-1 1/2 pounds of kale

chopping leeks

4 leeks, white and light green part, 3/4 pound trimmed  (The best leeks are fresh-not more than a week old-and 1 1/2 inches in diameter.)

5 large cloves of garlic, minced  (3 cubes of frozen garlic from Trader Joe’s is much easier.)

4 tbsp butter

8 tsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best, as olive oil is carcinogenic, when heated to high temperatures.)

1-2 tbsp fresh thyme, removed from stems, and coarsely chopped

Salt  (Real Salt is important for your health; available in the natural foods section at your local supermarket.)

Fresh ground pepper

  1. Place chicken in a large bowl of warm water to thaw, set aside.
  2. Spray all vegetables with an inexpensive effective spray, by combining 97% white distilled vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide; let sit 3 minutes; while waiting, if using fresh, mince garlic; rinse sprayed vegetables in a sink full of water several times.
  3. Cut celery diagonally in 1 inch pieces; scrape optional carrots with a sharp knife (this preserves vitamins just under the skin); slice thinly at a diagonal; set aside together in a bowl.
  4. Prepare leeks by first discarding outer leaves; cut off the dark green at the top and root hairs on bottom, leaving the white and light green part.  Cut each leek in half lengthwise; rinse well; then, cut each half in 2 inch pieces, by placing leek cut-side up on board; finally, slice these 2 inch lengths, cut-side up on board,

    cutting ribs out of kale

    into thin strips (see photo above); place pieces in a large container.  For final cleaning, rinse strips well with water, stirring with hand; then, drain in a colander.  This is known as the chiffonade-cut.

  5. Melt butter over medium heat in a sauté pan; as soon as a small piece sizzles in pan, add half the leeks, coating strips well with the hot butter. Reduce heat to low; cook down in pan, to make room for the rest of leeks, distributing oils well with each addition.  When all leeks are in pan, add garlic and slowly cook, covered, over low heat, stirring occasionally.
  6. straight-edge blade of food processor for chopping

    Cut ribs out of kale with a sharp knife (see above photo). May chop by hand, or quickly chop greens mechanically, by using the straight-edge blade of a food processor (see photo); turn processor on and place kale pieces in feeder tube (see photo below); set aside.

  7. Place thawed chicken on paper towel, salt and pepper GENEROUSLY.  Heat 1 tbsp of oil in a large frying pan over medium heat; when a small piece of chicken sizzles in oil, add the rest of the tenderloins; cook until light pink inside (do not overcook, as these will cook more later); cut tenderloins in bite-size pieces, removing them to a large bowl.  CAREFULLY SAVE JUICES IN PAN.
  8. Add 1 tablespoon of oil to these juices; mix in half the kale, distributing oils evenly.  Over medium heat, cook this vegetable down until there is room to add more; mix in oils with each addition, until all is in the pan; cook covered, until limp, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.  As needed, deglaze pan (scrape fond, cooked-on juices, off bottom with a spatula, after adding 2 or more tablespoons of water).  Remove to bowl of meat when done.
  9. placing kale in feeder tube of processor

    Meanwhile gently peel thyme off stems, chop coarsely with a sharp knife, set aside.

  10. Put last 2 teaspoons of oil in hot pan after kale is removed; add carrots and celery; mix well; cook until tender, stirring every couple of minutes.  Meantime go to next step.
  11. Blend 1-2 tablespoons chopped thyme, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper into leeks; stir in chicken/kale; continue cooking over low heat, until all is hot.  Add this mixture to pan of celery, when tender; adjust seasonings; one final time, scrape bottom to deglaze pan, using the juices from the added leek mixture.  Serve with confidence!

Cooking with Kale Made Extra Easy

Chopping kale in food processor

chopping kale in food processor

Last week’s easy kale recipe may be simplified even further.

A dear one from my church shares my passion for excellence with food.  She recently rolled out the red carpet for a small group of us; a repast of splendor marked the celebration of what would have been the 49th anniversary of her marriage; she commemorated this occasion with her friends, as her husband has been with Jesus for ten years now.  Her exquisite home and meal spoke volumes of exuberant love to my soul!  It foreshadowed the “marriage supper of the Lamb” for me.

This couple started the coffee movement.  Her husband trained a person who participated in creating one of the most popular, international, corporate franchises.  (Note: I will be doing a future post on this married team and the coffee development.)

My beloved fellow lover of foods has gifted me with new ailments; one such blessing was a bottle of Cherry Pomegranate Habanero Sauce from Robert Rothschild Farm; this inspired me to cook kale with a ready-made sauce.  Order this on-line or get it at Costco; any prepared sauce will work for the following recipe, of which a number are available at Trader Joe’s; thus, healthy fresh greens are made with the shortcut described below.

My other church friend, that provides the kale from her organic garden, shared her version for

Assembly of chopping attachment

assembly of chopping attachment

my receipt, which is makes this even easier.  She added a prepared spicy chicken, which she purchased from our upscale Whole Season’s Natural Foods; this eliminated the additional step of cooking the meat for this dish. The result was optimum health, heightened taste, and even greater culinary ease.

I use the food processor to chop all my leafy vegetables. (See how the assembled blade looks in the photo.)  Sometimes I have other greens on hand, such as beet tops, mustard greens, or spinach, which I mix in with my kale; this adds nutrition, when available. It only takes minutes to chop the prepared greens in this manner; I can’t encourage you enough to try these simple, healthy instructions.

 

 

Kale with Beef or Turkey and a Prepared Sauce  Yields: 4-6 servings.  Total prep time: 45 minutes.

8 1/2 teaspoons oil  (Coconut oil enhances flavor and quality here.)

1 medium yellow onion, halved at the core and cut in even 1/8 inch slices

1 lb ground turkey or beef  (Natural is best; Foster Farms natural ground turkey is inexpensive; a prepared meat from a deli is even quicker.)

Salt and pepper  (Real Salt is best; available in health section at local supermarket.)

1-1 1/2 lb fresh kale  (Organic is best.)

4 carrots, thinly sliced, at a diagonal

8-12 oz jar of prepared sauce

Avocado, sliced

  1. beginning stages of carmelization

    Heat 1/2 teaspoon of oil in a saute pan over medium heat.  Test for readiness by placing small piece of onion in hot oil; the temperature is right when it sizzles. Reduce heat to medium/low, add onions, and carmelize (cook until dark brown): stir once every several minutes until color starts to change (see photo); then, stir every minute until dark brown (see photo below). Watch carefully, as you go to next steps.

  2. Spray carrots and kale with produce spray (a mixture of 97% distilled white vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide is a cheap and effective cleaning solution); let vegetables sit three minutes; rinse three times in a sink full of water.
  3. Cook meat in 2 teaspoons of oil, in a large frying pan, over medium temperature; salt and pepper heavily; place in a bowl when done;  set aside pan for future use.  While this is cooking, go to next instruction.  If using a prepared meat, omit this step.
  4. Chop the wet kale in a food processor, by using the straight edge attachment; this is the large, round disk that fits onto the provided white “stem”; place this tall, assembled cutting disk in the food processor, where you normally put the smaller blade (see above photo).  Be sure to pick out large pieces of stem before setting aside chopped kale.  Note: you may chop this by hand, by first cutting out stems, then cutting kale into small pieces, using a sharp knife.
  5. finished carmelized onions

    Scrape cleaned carrots with knife (this preserves the vitamins just under the skin); slice carrots thinly, at a diagonal; set aside.

  6. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil over medium heat in pan the meat was cooked in; add carrots when a small piece sizzles in hot oil; cook covered for 2-3 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasionally.
  7. Place another tablespoon of oil in pan; add 1/2 the kale to carrots and distribute the oils, stirring well. (Be sure to check for big pieces of stem.) Repeat these steps with remaining kale; cook covered for 10 minutes, or until kale is limp; stir occasionally.
  8. When onion is carmelized, add meat and blend well.  Mix in  a generous amount of your favorite prepared sauce; flavor should be strong, as it will lighten, with the addition of vegetables.  Heat thoroughly.
  9. Add hot meat mixture into vegetables, when kale is cooked.
  10. Serve topped with fresh avocado slices.

Cooking with Kale

Honeyed Lime Kale with Ground Turkey

honeyed/lime kale with ground turkey

This series displays my relaxed creations with greens.  A close friend from my church blesses me with an abundance of fresh produce from her organic garden; I am wowed by its bountiful beauty.  She grows several species of kale; thus, I am always creating new recipes incorporating this health-giving vegetable.

Here I spell out detailed steps of preparation for cooking this green.  It’s easy to follow these directions.  Vibrant health results!

My recent series of posts on 19th century French foods defines Classic French cuisine (see Chicken a la Oignon, 2016/07/04, Carrots au Beurre, 2016/07/11 and Meringues a la Ude, 2016/07/18).  These posts expound on that culinary period following the French Revolution in 1775.  The main cooking procedure in my kale series is sautéing, which originated during this culinary age.

Cooking methods changed at the end of the 18th century, as Esther B. Aresty described in The Delectable Past: fireplaces gave way to ranges with built-in ovens; French cooks quickly invented the sauté pan.  The word sauté means to jump-when the fat “jumps” in the pan it is ready for cooking. 1

Here I give instructions for employing this cooking method properly.  First heat the oil; then, add a small piece of food; it is time to begin sautéing, when it sizzles or “jumps” in the pan.  This allows swift frying of food for optimum preservation of nutrients, as it inhibits the overcooking of vegetables and meats.

The following, easy recipe brings proficiency with cooking nutritious kale.  Next week I will share a shortcut, where this procedure is simplified even further, with prepared sauces and/or meats.

I pray this dish brings the same pleasure to you as it does me.  To our health!

  1. Esther B. Aresty, The Delectable Past (New York: Simon and Schuster, Inc., 1964), p. 126-127.
Food processor assembled with wide-blade, chopping attachment

food processor assembled with straight-edged, chopping attachment

Honeyed/Lime Kale with Beef or Turkey  Yields: 4-6 servings.  Prep time: 1 1/4 hours.

2 tbsp oil  (Coconut oil is best here for quality and flavor; olive oil is carcinogenic, when heated to high temperatures.)

1 medium yellow onion, halved at root, and cut in even 1/8 inch slices

1 lb ground turkey or beef  (Natural is best; Foster Farms’ natural ground turkey is inexpensive.)

Generous amounts of salt and pepper  (Real Salt is promotes optimum health; available in nutrition section at local supermarket.)

1-1  1/2 lbs of fresh kale  (Organic is best.)

4 carrots, thinly sliced at a diagonal  (Organic carrots are very inexpensive.)

Juice of 2 limes

2 tbsp honey

Avocado, cut in thick slices

  1. beginning stages of carmelization

    Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a saute pan over medium/low heat; add onions and carmelize, cook until dark brown.  Stir every two minutes, until color starts to form (see photo); then, stir every minute until dark brown (see photo below).  Be sure to watch carefully, while going to next steps.

  2. Place 2 teaspoon oil in large frying pan, over medium temperature; test for readiness by putting a small piece of meat in hot oil; the temperature is right when it sizzles or “jumps”.  Add rest of turkey; salt and pepper heavily, before browning; set aside in a  bowl when cooked; save pan for cooking vegetables.
  3. Meantime spray carrots and kale with produce spray (a mixture of 97% distilled white vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide is a cheap and effective cleaning solution); let sit three minutes; rinse well in a sink full of water three times.
  4. Cut stems out of wet kale; may chop into small bite-size pieces by hand, or better yet prepare it with a food processor by using the straight-edged, chopping attachment.  (This is the large, round disk that fits onto the provided “stem”; place this tall, assembled cutting disk in the food processor where you normally put the smaller blade; see above photo.)  Set aside chopped kale.
  5. finished carmelized onions

    Scrape cleaned carrots with a sharp knife (this preserves the vitamins just under the skin); slice carrots thinly at a diagonal; set aside.

  6. Heat lime juice and honey in a small saucepan, just until blended, set aside.
  7. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil over medium heat; when a piece of carrot sizzles in hot oil, add carrots and cook for 2 minutes.
  8. Add 1/2 the kale, distributing the oils well; cook down in pan; repeat this step with remaining kale, when there is room; cook covered for 10 minutes, or until kale is limp, stirring occasionally.
  9. When onion is carmelized, mix this and meat into cooked kale; blend in the honeyed/lime juice; adjust seasonings.
  10. Enjoy topped with fresh avocado slices.