Great Keto Citrus Cookies

keto citrus cookies

These keto citrus cookies-my sister Maureen’s creation-are a treat, as is the following information on Swerve confectioner’s sugar, which is used in the frosting.  Here I compare it to Lakanto Monfruit sweetener.

Personally I prefer the taste of Lakanto Monkfruit sweetner, with erythritol and monkfruit, to Swerve, a blend of erythritol and prebiotic oligosacchariedes; I notice that Swerve leaves a slight aftertaste, when consumed with coffee, a flavor-enhancer.

Both are natural sweeteners, containing nothing artificial including no preservatives; they are non-GMO, gluten-free, non-glycemic, and diabetic friendly.  They taste and measure like sugar.

These two sweeteners are part erythritol.  Lakanto Monkfruit has monkfruit added, which is derived from the fruit called monkfruit (for details see Date/Apricot Bars, 2019/06/12).  On the other hand, Swerve states its ingredients come from select fruits and starchy root vegetables.  In this case, they add oligosaccharides to  the erythritol.

These oligosaccharides are derived from adding enzymes to starchy root vegetables, thus breaking down the starch and producing this carbohydrate, whose molecules are made up of a relatively small number of monosaccharide units.  1

Common oligosaccharides include the simple, single sugars-monosaccharides-glucose, fructose, and galactose.  1,4 glycosidic bonds bind these together to create disaccharides, such as sucrose, lactose, and maltose.  All sugars-known as oligaosaccharides-are formed when two or more monosaccharides are joined together by O-glycosidic bonds.  2

Another term for sugar is saccharide, while the word oligosaccharide, though a broad term, is most commonly used to refer to a carbohydrate polymer whose molecules are composed of a relatively small number of these monosaccharide units-typically between 3-9 units.  3

Swerve does not reveal what type of simple sugar, or monosaccharide, is used to make up its carbohydrate polymers, which are specifically referred to as oligosacchrides here.  They also state that they have introduced a small amount of natural citrus flavor, though we don’t know exactly what is meant by “natural flavor”, or more specifically how it is derived in this case.  4

Its oligosaccharides are prebiotic fibers, or types of dietary fiber that feed the friendly bacteria in your gut, which cannot be broken down by the human digestive tract; thus, they are considered calorie-free, passing intact through our digestive systems into our colons, where they support the growth of healthy bacteria.  Being calories that our bodies cannot assimilate, these oligosaccharides are considered to be calorie-free, not raising blood sugar or insulin levels; they, however, may cause digestive upsets, leading to gas, bloating, and diarrhea, which is especially true when used in high amounts.  5

In its favor, Swerve boasts that it browns and caramelizes just like sugar.  I, however, am not as sold on its flavor as much as that of Lakanto Monkfruit, but large amounts of this latter may cause dryness in baked goods.  Nevertheless, I love Monkfruit-over Swerve-added to my hot oats and chia seed parfaits, as well as in baking, when used moderately, with the addition of konjac root powder, or a similar product.  Swerve, however, makes confectioners sugar, a must for frostings, as found in the recipe below.

My health condition recently called for a decrease in the amount of carbohydrates I was taking in.  Thus, I became interested in Dr. Colbert’s keto diet.  This greatly reduces carbs, while calling for a concentration of high-quality fats, to achieve keto-zone for effective weight loss (see https://drcolbert.com/).

My personal need, however, is to be sure I eat enough calories in a day, so as not to lose weight, while not consuming high amounts of carbs for those needed calories.  Henceforth, I follow the keto diet loosely, not needing to maintain keto-zone that his patients require for losing weight effectively.  I have only skimmed the surface of all Colbert’s teachings, receiving his recommendations for 70% of your daily caloric intake, to be derived from healthy fats (see Date/Apricot Bars, 2019/06/12).

I have learned to love my homemade ghee-recipe at Vichy Carrots, 2019/07/11-in my hot cereal, and I lavish grass-fed Kerry butter on keto bisquits made with almond flour-my next entry.  Likewise, I fill a tablespoon-size impression in my homemade, sprouted three-bean dip, with organic olive oil, the king of all oils-a quick and easy way to consume my needed fat.  (See recipe for Sprouted Three Bean Dip at 2019/05/13.)  This last I eat with just eleven organic bean chips, as recommended for a serving, counting all my carbohydrates carefully.

I can have a moderate amount of carbs, just not the quantity I was previously eating to maintain calories for my weight.  I have learned it is all about balance!

We notice that there is always a tension of some sort in watching our diets, as well as in maintaining other life experiences.  This characteristic in our existence demands that we be alert, so as not to be caught off-guard in matters of physical and mental health.

Our inward wisdom will naturally resolve these apparent problems, when we quiet ourselves and subject our instinct-to react with feelings-rather, to settle in calm!  We always ask God for help to access our inner voice.

In this way, we don’t eat compulsively, tasting nothing, or of equal importance, don’t eat at all, because of emotions.

In regard to living with this inward stability, we must avoid high-frenzied reactions to the inevitable fiery darts, which cause hypertension.  Neither, do we give an opening for inertia, brought on by over-stimulation,, producing the need to stop the world and get off.

All this can be done, when in rest-believing-we seek composure in both eating and living.  We always achieve this symmetry, when we ask God for his needed help.

 

References:

  1. https://swervesweet.com/about
  2. https://teaching.ncl.ac.uk/bms/wiki/index.php/Oligosaccharide
  3. Ibid.
  4. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/swerve-sweetener
  5. Ibid.

finished product

Keto Citrus Cookies  Yields: about 18 cookies.  Total prep time: 1 1/5 hr /  active prep time: 48 min/  inactive prep time: 10 min/  baking time: 12 min .  Note: frosting is enough for three cookie recipes; may triple cookie recipe, or better yet freeze leftover frosting in separate containers, for future single batches.  Cookies also freeze really well!

 

 

1 orange & 1 lemon  (Organic is important here for flavor and quality, as skin of citrus fruits readily absorb pesticides.)

1/2 c unsalted butter, softened

3/4 c Lankanto Monkfruit sweetener  (This is available most reasonably at Costco.)

1 lg egg

1 tsp vanilla extract

Zest of 1 lemon and 1 orange

2 c almond flour  (Costco’s almond flour is much cheaper than any other available-$12.99 for a 3-lb bag.)

1/2 tsp baking soda

1 tsp konjac root powder, or a similar product of your choice

1/2 tsp salt  (Himalayan, pink, or Real Salt is essential for optimum health; a fine grind Himalayan salt is available at Costco for $4.95 for 5 lbs.)

Frosting  (This is enough for three recipes, which stores well in refrigerator for several weeks, or in the freezer for a longer period.  Subsequent batches of these cookies are quick and easy; be sure to divide into three equal parts, storing two parts in individual containers.)

1 stick of butter, softened

8 oz cream cheese, softened

1 pkg of Swerve confectioner’s sugar

1/3 c blended juice of 1 lemon and 1 orange

Zest of 1 lemon and 1 orange

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/2 tsp salt

  1. grating fruit

    Be sure butter and cream cheese are softened, before starting recipe.

  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  3. Zest 2 lemons and 2 oranges, if making frosting at the same time as baking cookies; if using leftover frosting, therefore baking cookies separately, just zest one of each fruit.  Set aside zest, see photo above.
  4. dough

    If making frosting, juice all fruit together in a bowl; set aside.

  5. Mix butter and Monkfruit.  Beat well egg, vanilla, and half the blended zest, in a large bowl.
  6. Blend baking soda, xanthium gum, and salt into almond flour, using a separate dish-better yet, shake well in a quart-size sealed storage bag.  Mix almond flour mixture into butter mixture; do not over-beat.  See above photo.
  7. forming balls of dough

    Using a teaspoon, form balls on an 18” x 12” parchment-lined cookie sheet, several inches apart from each other; see photo.

  8. Bake in hot oven for 11-12 minutes, or until light golden brown.  Do not over-bake, as these will cook more on pan while cooling; see bottom photo.  Meanwhile, make frosting.
  9. golden brown cookies

    Mix frosting by creaming together softened butter and room-temperature cream cheese; add confectioner’s sugar; then, beat in 1/3 c blended fruit juices.  Finally mix in remaining zest, vanilla and salt.

  10. When cookies are done, cool on pan; then, place on wax paper to frost (see photo at top of recipe).
  11. Enjoy these great, “legal” cookies!

Healthy Date/Apricot Bars

date/apricot bars

Here is a receipt for a great date/apricot bar, sweetened with a monk fruit sweetener; it is complete with information on this great alternative sweetener.  This makes a healthy breakfast bar.  The recipe is another one of my sister’s notes of grandeur, derived by her ingenious cooking skills, which she originally made with sugar.  Today, however, her cooking is inspired by the keto diet (therefore this bar no longer fits in her diet plan).

Recently I have begun investigating this keto way of eating for myself, which promotes a diet of high-fat, moderate-protein, and low-carbohydrates.  I am looking to it for its over-all health benefits, rather than for weight loss.  The more I read, the more convinced I am that the avoidance of sugars, as well as a high intake of the right kind of fat calories, is beneficial for our bodies both to maintain health and loose weight, but it is essential that they be the right kind of fats.

Dr. Don Colbert has an excellent plan, the keto-zone diet, in which you bring your bodies into a state of ketosis, burning fat for energy, rather than glucose (sugar), by using premium fats for 70% of your daily caloric intake.  Presently I am exploring in depth his teachings on the multi-health benefits of his diet.  Not needing to loose weight, I don’t restrict my carbohydrates quite as strictly as his diet requires-until I learn otherwise.  Therefore I partake in this bar, which is made with organic whole wheat pastry flour, oats, butter, and monk fruit sweetener.

Indeed, high quality fats (avocado, olive oil, grass-fed ghee, MCT oil, krill oil) are important also for those of us who aren’t in need of shedding pounds,.  Rather we have a need to take in enough calories to maintain weight and acquire optimum health.  Consuming lots of rich desserts and empty starch calories to keep weight can lead to diabetes among other serious conditions.  1

The use of good alternative sweeteners is equally important, as eating the right kind of fats; these bars are made with butter and Lakanto Monkfruit Sweetener, which is available at Costco.  Monk fruit sweeteners are typically a mixture of monk fruit extract and other natural products such as inulin or erythritol;.  This Costco product is a blend of erythritol-the first ingredient-and monk fruit, also known as lo han guo, or Swingle fruit (Siraitia grosvenorii), which is a small round fruit, native to southern China.  2

Costco’s Monkfruit has a sweetness equal to sugar, though other blends may have a sweetness ranging from 100-250 times greater than table sugar.  The intensity of sweetness depends on the amount of mogrosides present.  Mogrosides are the compound-a unique antioxidant-in monk fruit extract, which are separated from the fresh-pressed juice of this Asian monk fruit during processing.  When separated they are free of calories; these sweet-flavored antioxidants-mogrosides-are mainly responsible for the sweetness of this fruit, rather than its other natural sugars, fructose and glucose.  Fructose and glucose are actually totally removed during the processing of this extract.  3

Though more research is needed to verify the health benefits of mogroside extracts from monk fruit, there is some evidence that they may have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, as well as possibly having positive effects on cancer and diabetes.  Current studies, however, use much higher doses of monk fruit extract than that consumed in this sweetening product.  4

We find the satisfying of our need for pleasure is much needed in healthy eating, but how this calls for balance.  Indeed, balance is a key to all that concerns us about food, and it is imperative that we make the effort to discover what works best for us individually.  Our bodies are unique and complex.  Food can work as a medicine, as well as be a rich blessing to our souls, when consumed properly.

Eating with an attitude of reverence is a key to tapping into gastronomic pleasure.  One simple tool in reaching this goal is to focus on that childhood instruction “chew carefully”.  In order to do this, it’s imperative to slow down.

We find the need to slow down and “chew carefully” is present in all of life’s endeavors, in order to reap the maximum goodness promised; as the old adage goes “slow down and smell the roses”.

To achieve this, it is important to give thanks to our Creator for our food, as well as for all the daily blessings and trials that come our way.  Such insures our joy.  We apply this gratitude to the not-so-good, not for the trouble itself, but rather for our resultant growth that develops out of overcoming hardship.  Such a heart bent on thanksgiving pleases our God immensely; it guarantees a prosperous life.  (For more on heightened pleasures of proper eating, see Parmesan Dover Sole, 2017/04/10.)

Enjoy this delightful recipe!

References:

  1. https://drcolbert.com/7-healthy-fats-to-help-you-burn-belly-flab/
  2. https://foodinsight.org/everything-you-need-to-know-about-monk-fruit-sweeteners/
  3. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/monk-fruit-sweetener
  4. Ibid.

finished product

Healthy Date/Apricot Bars  Yields: 2 dozen.  Total prep time: 1 1/2 hr/  active prep time: 40 min/  baking time: 50 min.

2 c pitted dates, packed down firmly, chopped  (I suggest taking a measuring cup to the store, thus pre-measuring fruit, as you buy in bulk).

2/3 c dried apricots, cut small

1 1/3 c butter, softened  (Plus several additional tbsp, as needed for moistening last of crumbs.)

1 c Lakanto Monkfruit Sweetner, cane sugar, or coconut sugar  (This Monkfruit is available at Costco.)

1 2/3 c old-fashioned oats (Organic is only slightly more expensive in bulk; available at most grocery stores.)

3 c flour (Organic whole wheat pastry flour is best.)

1 1/2 tsp salt  (Himalayan, pink, or Real Salt is critical for optimum health; a fine grind Himalayan salt is available at Costco for $4.99/5 lbs.)

Spray oil  (Coconut spray oil is preferable for quality and taste.)

  1. thickened fruit-sauce

    Beat 1 1/3 c butter in a large bowl; blend in Monkfruit sweetner or sugar, beating until light.  Set aside.

  2. Measure dates in a measuring cup, packing down firmly; with a chef’s knife, chop into small pieces.  Repeat these steps with the apricots.
  3. “sifting” in sealed plastic bag

    Place fruit in a medium saucepan.  Add 2 1/4 c of water, cover, and bring to a boil over med/high heat.

  4. Remove lid, lower temperature and boil softly, uncovered, until a thick sauce is formed.  Be sure to stir about every 5 minutes.  Watch fruit carefully as it thickens, so as not to burn (see photo above).
  5. mealy crust

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

  6. In a plastic sealed storage bag, place flour, oats, and salt.  Close the seal and shake vigorously (see above photo).
  7. Blend flour mixture into butter, until mealy; see photo.
  8. Place 3/5 of flour/butter mixture in bottom of a 9” x 13” pan, which has been lightly sprayed with oil.  Pack down evenly with hand, being sure to pat edges and corners really well.
  9. initial baking of crust

    Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes (see photo).

  10. Remove from oven and gently spread thickened fruit-sauce over top of crust.  Then, taking the rest of the flour/butter mixture, firmly pat rounds of dough between your two hands, placing these solid masses on top of date/apricots, until all is covered.  (May add a little additional soft butter to dry crumbs in the bottom of bowl, to moisten them and facilitate the last of the forming.)  See photo below.
  11. forming of top crust

    Return to oven and bake 30 minutes more, or until golden brown; see photo at top of recipe.

  12. Cut into bars, while still warm.  May freeze part of batch to have on hand for a nutritious breakfast bars.