Quick and Delicious Leek Soup

bowl of leek soup

The history of leeks is colorful. They have been cultivated both in Europe and Central Asia for thousands of years; they are considered to be native to the latter and the Mediterranean, though historical texts from other areas mention them as well. There are Biblical accounts of their presence in Egypt, in northeastern Africa, during early world history: when times got tough in the wilderness, the children of Israel longed for this delicacy, to the point that they were willing to return to their captivity under Pharaoh; archaeological digs support the presence of leeks in the Egyptian diet for the past 4 millennia.

Shortly after Christ’s presence on earth, during the first century A.D., the Roman Emperor Nero consumed them daily, for he adhered to their healing power in strengthening one’s singing voice.  Greek philosopher Aristotle concurred with this commonly accepted belief in ancient times, for he attributed the clear voice of the partridge to its diet consisting of this vegetable.

As the Roman Empire spread, its soldiers allegedly brought this choice food to the tables of the United Kingdom, where its popularity grew greatly.  As far back as the 6th century A.D., according to legend, Welsh soldiers were wearing a leek in their helmets for identification purposes, a tradition that was carried on in subsequent centuries.  Shakespeare, whom I studied in London in 1974, refers to this Welsh passion in Henry V.  Such enthusiasm continues in Wales in present times, for this member of the onion family is now its national emblem, along with the daffodil.

My first encounter with this Allium occurred in the 1980’s in Billings, Montana, when an Irish friend taught me how to make leek soup, as part of a complete Irish meal.  I had need to know how to cook this national cuisine authentically, for I had contributed a catered St. Patrick’s Day dinner to a fundraiser’s auction, which the local radio station had promoted well; thus, I had ten eager winners expecting the best.  My friend, whose roots were in Ireland, put his heart into equipping me for this fun event; he even made a huge Irish flag, which I still possess.

Leek soup is prevalent in many different nationalities; I serve a Potage Bonne Femme, a potato and leek soup, in a 19th century French banquet from my repertoire.  My present version, however, is superior.  For more recipes and information on leeks go to  Zucchini Chicken with Leeks and Shallots (2017/08/28) and Kale, Leeks, and Chicken (2017/09/04).

Enjoy this fast soup recipe both now and for years to come; it is that good.

References:

https://draxe.com/leeks/

http://foodfacts.mercola.com/leeks.html

http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/Historyof Wales/TheLeek-National-emblem-of-the-Welsh

www.wales-calling.com/culture/leeks-and-daffodil.htm

trimming leeks

Leek Soup  Yields: 2 quarts.  Total prep time: 1 hr.

3 leeks, white and light green part, 2/3 pound trimmed

1 medium/large yellow onion, chopped small

2 celery ribs, in small dice  (If desired, may omit the celery and double the potatoes, or vice versa double the celery, omitting the potatoes, to be diabetic friendly.)

7 tbsp butter, preferably unsalted  (If using only celery, 9 tbsp butter will be needed.)

2 small Yukon potatoes, 2/3 pound, peeled and chopped in 1/2 inch cubes

4 cups chicken broth  (Bone broth is best for food value; see Tortellini Soup, 2016/10/10.)

1/2 cup water

1 bay leaf

1 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is important for optimum health; available in nutrition center at local supermarket.)

1/2 tsp white pepper, or to taste

1/4 tsp nutmeg, or to taste  (Fresh ground is best.)

1/2 bunch-1/2 cup chopped-Italian flat parsley  (Organic is only slightly more expensive and much healthier.)

2 tbsp flour

1 cup whipping cream

1 tsp Better than Bouillon soup base, or to taste  (Chicken flavor is best, but vegetable flavor will also do.)

  1. Spray all vegetables, including parsley, with a vegetable spray (a mixture of 97% distilled white vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide is effective and inexpensive); let sit for 3 minutes; rinse well.
  2. rinsing chopped leeks

    Remove dark green top off leeks, leaving the white and light green part.  With the root in tact, cut leek in half lengthwise (see above photo); fan out under running water to remove dirt.  Holding the two halves together, cut each leek in 1/4-inch-thick slices; place pieces in a large container; rinse well with water, stirring with hand (see photo); drain in a colander.

  3. Chop onion, set aside.
  4. Melt 1/4 cup butter in a large stock pot over medium heat; chop the celery in small 1/4 inch dice; watch butter so as not to burn.  (Use 6 tablespoons of butter, if doubling the celery, by omitting the potatoes.)
  5. Add leeks, onion, and celery to melted butter, distributing it well throughout vegetables; cook covered for about 12 minutes, stirring frequently, so they don’t brown (this will sweat the onions and leeks, or turn them translucent).
  6. Peel and cut potatoes in small 1/2 inch pieces, placing them in a bowl of water to keep them from turning color.
  7. When leeks and onions are translucent, add drained potatoes, broth, 1/2 cup water, bay leaf, salt, pepper, and nutmeg to pot.
  8. making roux

    Cover and bring to a boil over medium/high heat; lower heat and simmer, partially covered, for about 20 minutes, or until potatoes are soft; stir occasionally

  9. Wash parsley, remove stems, chop, and set aside
  10. Make a roux by melting 3 tablespoons butter in a small saucepan over medium heat; blend in 2 tablespoon of flour with a wire whisk; cook until golden brown, mixing continuously (see photo).
  11. When potatoes are soft, whisk 1 cup of soup broth into pan of roux; add a second cup of broth, blending thoroughly; this mixture will be quite thick.
  12. Add parsley, cream, and roux to soup in stock pot.  Mix in a teaspoon of Better than Bouillon, to heighten taste; adjust seasonings; simmer for another 5 minutes (see photo of finished product).
  13. finished product

    Serve hot and enjoy!  (Flavors meld best after sitting for a day.)

Borscht (Beet Soup)

a bowl of borscht

This borscht recipe has been with me since my catering days in Billings, Montana, when I was preparing soups for a café in an art gallery, during the early 1980’s.  Now it graces my table every summer.  A particular prayer partner claims my version is far better than that which she had in Russia.  Indeed, this chilled soup is a beautiful offering on a hot summer day!

This delicacy has been long popular in Eastern European countries under the following names: borscht, borsch, borshch, and bosht.  Over time it has spread from these nations to other continents, as their people emigrated; in North America, it is commonly linked with the Jews and Mennonites that came from these areas.  The common name borscht is derived from the Russian borsch meaning cow parsnip, which was an original recipe ingredient of the Slavs.

The most familiar American adaptation of this soup, which is made with beetroot, is of Ukrainian origin.  With its first record being in the 12th century, this dish subsequently emerged from a wide variety of sour-tasting soups present in the Eastern European section, such as rye-based white borscht, sorrel-based green borscht, and cabbage borscht.  Our well-known Ukrainian recipe was originally inspired by the addition of leftover beetroot pickling; thus, its brilliant color and tart flavor.

There are as many different preparations for this beet soup as there are homes in which it is consumed; they may include the additions of meat, fish, cabbage, carrots, tomatoes, and potatoes.

Spanish conquistadors brought potatoes and tomatoes from America to Europe in the 16th century; these vegetables weren’t a common part of the Eastern European peasants’ diet, however, until the 19th century, at which time they found their way into the Ukrainian and Russian borscht, food of both poor men and princes.  As a result of emigration, tomatoes and potatoes are a part of borscht recipes around the world, but my version has neither of these.

Still other variations occur with this renowned soup involving its garnishes and side dishes.  Smetana, or sour cream, is its most common topping; chopped herbs, hard-boiled eggs, bacon, and sausage may also be utilized.  There are plentiful side dishes; among them are pampushky (Ukrainian garlic rolls) and treasured pirozhki (individually sized pastries or dumplings filled with meat and onions).

You can see that despite its centuries-long history there is no consistent receipt for this sustaining chilled delight, for even this latter characteristic may vary, and it may be served hot.  My borscht is a cold, meatless, summer soup adorned with sour cream and eggs; for the benefit of added protein make this recipe with bone broth, from my post on Tortellini Soup (2016/10/10).  This is a treat!

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borscht

https://www.britannica.com/topic/borsch

www.dictionary.com/browse/borscht

easy mincing of onion

Borscht (Beet Soup)  Yields: 4-5 servings.  Total prep time: 1 hr/  active prep time:30 min/  cooking time: 30 min

1 tbsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best; olive oil is carcinogenic when heated to high temperatures.)

1 medium/large yellow onion

3 large purple beets, a little less than 2 pounds without the tops

1 quart broth  (I prefer bone broth, 2016/10/10, for powerful health benefits including high protein.)

1 cup water

2 small lemons, juiced  (Use half to start; then, adjust with more to taste.)

1 tbsp honey, or to taste  (Local raw honey is always best, for its localized bee pollen is known to relieve allergies naturally through the concept of immunotherapy.)

1 tsp Better than Bouillon, or to taste

1/2 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is important for optimum health; available at your local supermarket.)

1/2 tsp fresh ground pepper, or to taste

sweating onions

Sour cream

3 extra-large eggs, hard-boiled and chopped

  1. Chop the onion in small pieces the easy way (see above photo).  Peel it leaving the root on; next, score this by cutting slices close together across the top one way, going 3/4 of the way down into the onion; then, turn it and cut slices the opposite direction.  When onion is thus prepared, shave the small pieces off the end with a sharp knife.  May discard root end; set aside chopped vegetable.
  2. Heat oil in a stock pot over medium heat; add piece of onion; when it sizzles, add remaining onion; sweat, cook only until translucent (see photo).  Set aside, go to next step.
  3. Spray beets with an inexpensive, effective vegetable spray (mix 97% distilled white vinegar with 3% hydrogen peroxide in a spray bottle).  Let sit for 3 minutes and rinse well.
  4. Peel and cut beets in 1/4 inch dice; add to cooked onions.
  5. Cover with broth and water; bring to a boil over medium/high heat; reduce heat and simmer for about 30 minutes, or until beets are soft.
  6. borscht cooking in pot

    Add half the lemon juice and honey.

  7. Stir in Better than Bouillon; then, add salt and pepper.
  8. Adjust lemon juice, honey, Bouillon, salt, and pepper to taste.
  9. Chill for 4 hours or overnight.  Serve topped with sour cream and chopped hard-boiled eggs.  (May make ahead and freeze.)
  10. I love this summer soup!

1880’s Philadelphia Clam Chowder

mincing clams

mincing fresh razor clams

My great clam chowder is adapted from a recipe in General Mills’, mid-20th century Special Silver Dollar City Edition of Miss Parloa’s New Cook Book; this reproduced cookbook was originally published in 1880, by Washburn Crosby Co., the makers of Gold Medal flour.  (This collection also includes my all-time favorite oatmeal cookie, which I will share at a later date.)

I have enlarged upon this 19th century method of making this dish, by adding such flavor/texture enhancers as garlic, onion, celery, and unpeeled potatoes.  Miss Parloa calls her receipt Philadelphia clam chowder; it introduces the technique of straining the clams, thus lending a delicate touch to the fish soup.  I am not a big fan of clam chowder, but I love this because of its mellowness, resulting from the removal of the clam juice.

There is much to be said about the distinctive flavors of shellfish and fish.  Harold McGee shares this apt science in his excellent treatise On Food and Cooking.  He teaches why ocean and freshwater creatures vary so greatly in taste, the former having a much stronger bite.

Ocean water is about 3% salt by weight, while the optimum level of all dissolved minerals inside of animal cells is less than 1%.  Consequently ocean creatures need to balance this substantial salt mineral, that they are breathing in and swallowing; they do this with amino acids, amines, and urea, which their bodies produce.

Behold, these substances have different flavors!  For example the amino acid glycine is sweet, while glutamic acid is savory; shellfish are especially rich in these and other amino acids.  Unlike shellfish, finfish rely heavily on the amine TMAO for processing salt, which is largely tasteless.  Sharks, skates, and rays make ready the salt water with a slightly salty and bitter urea.  However, this urea and the amine TMAO are converted into stinky substances, by bacteria and fish enzymes in these dead, ocean-dwelling fish; thus, after they are killed, their meat tastes and smells powerfully bad with age, while that of their freshwater relatives doesn’t.

Freshwater fish have a gentler effect on our taste buds, because the water they live in is actually less salty, than that of their cells; therefore, they do not need to accumulate these pungent amino acids, amines, or urea, which their ocean-dwelling cousins require to process the dissolved mineral salt.

You can see that different shellfish and fish supply our mouths with unique experiences.  Seawater varieties use a diversity of amino acids, amines, and urea to balance the salt in their cellular systems; these differing substances boast of a wide variety of powerful tastes.  Their freshwater counterparts, which don’t require these salt equalizers, are bland by comparison.

Miss Parloa counters the strong flavor of clam chowder by straining the clams, removing their excess liquid, which has an abundance of the above mentioned amino acids.  (For more history on Miss Parloa and 19th century American cuisine, see 1880’s Escalloped Salmon-2017/04/17, 1880’s Minced Cabbage-2017/04/24, and 1880’s Ozark Honey-Oatmeal Cookies-2017/10/30.)  I take this illustrious chef’s simple inspiration and provide an even richer experience, with additional textures and mouth-watering thrills.  You will like this delicious, yet mild, chowder!

References:

General Mills’ Special Silver Dollar City Edition of Maria Parloa’s , Miss Parloa’s New Cook Book (Boston: Estes and Lauriat, 1880).  This partial reproduction was printed sometime in the mid-20th century.

Harold McGee, On Food and Cooking, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1984, 2004), pp. 188-189.

Philadelphia Clam Chowder  Adapted from a recipe in General Mill’s, mid-20th century Special Silver Dollar City Edition of Maria Parloa’s  Miss Parloa’s New Cook Book (Boston: Estes and Lauriat, 1880).  Yields: 8 servings.  Total prep time: 1 hr & 30 min/  active prep time: 30 min/  cooking time: 1 hr.

Note: if you don’t have large enough pots for the makeshift double boiler-see step 1 for photo and directions-just cook the soup over direct heat; this, however, may cause it to separate some, but this last option will reduce the cooking time.

1 1/2 tbsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best; olive oil is carcinogenic at high temperatures.)

1 large yellow onion, chopped

3 tbsp butter

3 tbsp flour

6 ounce drained weight minced clams, or 3 strained 6.5 ounce cans  (May use 6 ounces fresh razor clams, chopped fine, see top photo.)

2 stalks celery, cut in 1/4 inch dice

3 tbsp parsley, minced

1 lb potatoes, unpeeled, chopped in small 1/2 inch pieces

5 large cloves garlic, minced  (May use 3 cubes of frozen garlic from Trader Joe’s for easy prep.)

1 1/2 quarts milk  (Whole milk is preferable.)

1 1/2 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is best; available in health section at local supermarkets.)

1/2 tsp white pepper, or to taste

  1. make-shift double boiler

    make-shift double boiler

    Heat coconut oil in a 4-quart pot that will sit inside a slightly larger pot to make a double boiler, see photo.  (If you don’t have two large pots, cook the chowder over direct heat; cooking will be faster with this last option, however, the cream soup may separate some.)

  2. When a small piece of onion sizzles in oil, add the rest of the onions and sweat, cook until translucent.  Remove from heat when done.
  3. Fill larger pot 2/5’s full of hot tap water and bring to a boil over high heat.
  4. Meantime make roux, by melting butter in a small sauté pan over medium heat.  Add flour and stir constantly with a wire whisk; cook until light brown in color, about 2 minutes; set aside.
  5. Spray celery, parsley, and potatoes with a safe, inexpensive, effective produce spray: fill a spray bottle with a mixture of 97% distilled white vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide.  After spraying vegetables, let sit for 3 minutes, rinse really well.
  6. Drain canned clams in a colander.  If using fresh razor clams, drain and chop fine (see top photo).
  7. Chop all vegetables and garlic; add to pot of cooked onions.
  8. Add milk, clams, salt, and pepper to the pan of vegetables.  Fit this smaller pan into the larger pot, so it sits above the boiling water (see photo).  Watch water level while cooking to make sure water doesn’t boil dry.  Cook chowder until potatoes are soft, about 50 minutes.  Note: if preparing over direct heat, bring soup to a gentle boil; lower heat; and simmer until potatoes are soft-this option will lessen the cooking time.
  9. When vegetables are soft, beat in roux with a big spoon; cook 5 more minutes, or until soup is thickened.  Stir constantly.
  10. Adjust seasonings and serve.  May freeze leftovers; when you heat thawed chowder, however, it will be of a thinner consistency.  If desired, you may thicken with a small amount of roux-about 1 tbsp of melted butter cooked with an equal amount of flour-this amount will be adequate to thicken 4 leftover servings.
  11. I am passionate about this soup!

Butternut Squash Soup

butternut squash soup

butternut squash soup

My creative sister concocted this heavenly soup and gave the recipe to me years ago.  It has frequently graced my table, where my guests experience God’s peace.

Someone once said that a meal at my home is like going to a spiritual spa.  With God’s help, I nourish both the body and soul elegantly!

My vision for this blog is to sustain people with wholesome food through the written word; thus, they will build strong bodies.

However, I am fully aware that a vibrant physique isn’t enough to insure complete health-that of body, mind, emotions, relationships, and finances.  How clear it is: we miss the totality of this by lack of knowledge!  My desire is that vital truth, which sets people free, will be revealed to all.

A specific prayer, which establishes this verity, has come to me in a Scripture.  I see a means for the Spirit of God to release this needed life, to everyone, in Isaiah 30:21, KJV: …yet shall not thy teachers be removed into a corner any more, but thine eyes shall see thy teachers: and thine ears shall hear the word behind thee, saying, This is the way, walk ye in it, when ye turn to the right hand, and when ye turn to the left.

Indeed only God can liberate all.  We as individuals can directly reach but a few. However the Holy Spirit can move without restriction, when our faith releases him to do so. Our petitions can reach every last man on earth with the power of his word, when we ask believing.

My lavish meals feed many, both physically and spiritually; my blog contacts a good number more.  However, my prayers expand to Uganda, England, Germany, Peru, Kenya-to mention a few of the nations that constitute the cry of my heart. Our absolute faith in the word provides for the desperate in India, whom I have carefully covered for years.

Our Father redeems all that we ask for in complete trust.  This is his greatest pleasure and highest priority.  My steadfast petition is that my writings/recipes will eradicate our health deficiencies-first those in our bodies and then in every other area of our lives.  God bless our journey together in this!

My favorite way to entertain is by having only one or two guests: the conversation is most intimate then.  I always keep individual containers of soup, which hold 2-3 servings, in my freezer; thus, it is easy to serve at my small dinner parties.

I suggest you buy a five-pound squash and save one pound of it for next week’s recipe, sautéed squash with curried yogurt sauce.  If you have leftovers of the soup, freeze some for unexpected visitors.

pot of butternut squash soup

pot of butternut squash soup

Butternut Squash Soup  Yields: 8 servings.  Total preparation time: 1 ½ hr/ active prep time: 30 min/ cooking time: 1 hr.

4 tbsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best.)

2 large onions, halved at root and sliced thinly

4 lb butternut squash, unpeeled and cut in chunks  (I prefer organic; you may buy an extra pound to cover next week’s recipe.)

2 quarts bone broth  (See recipe for this power food at Tortellini Soup, 2016/10/10, or substitute two 1-liter boxes of chicken broth.)

2 tbsp cinnamon

1 tbsp dried ginger

1 tsp nutmeg

½ tsp ground cloves

4 tbsp fresh ginger, peeled and chopped fine

4 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is best; available in the health section of your local supermarket.)

½ tsp white pepper, or to taste

  1. Heat oil in a stock pot over medium heat.  Add a small piece of onion; when it sizzles, add the rest of the onions and sweat (cook until translucent).
  2. Meanwhile clean squash with an inexpensive, effective vegetable spray (a mixture of 97% white distilled vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide); spray squash, let sit for 3 minutes, rinse extra well.
  3. Cut unpeeled squash in chunks.  Be sure to remove the seeds first.  Add to cooked onions.
  4. Pour broth in pot.  Add spices, fresh ginger, salt and pepper.
  5. Bring to a boil.  Simmer for 40-50 minutes, or until squash is very soft. (See above photo.)  Remove from heat.
  6. Puree with an immersion blender.  (This is also known as a blender-on-a-stick; available at Bed, Bath and Beyond at a moderate price.)
  7. Adjust seasonings, serve hot, freeze any leftovers.

Medieval Perrey of Peson Soup

Perrey of peson soup

perrey of peson soup

This heavenly soup is from the late 14th century manuscript collection titled the Forme of Cury (Manner of Cookery).  King Richard II, who reigned in England from 1377-99, requested the compilation of the methods of food preparation from his grand court. This record of 196 recipes resulted.  He was an extravagant king who daily dined with over 10,000 guests.  It took 300 cooks to prepare his extraordinary meals.  These manuscript receipts providentially allow us to replicate, in part, the flavor of his feasts.

Lorna Sass discovered two volumes published by the Early English Text Society, while she was researching at the Columbia University library in the early 1970’s. They were filled with Medieval manuscript recipes; among them was the Forme of Cury. She published a number of these in To the King’s Taste in 1975.  Here she includes both the original version in Middle English and her translation of that. This is followed by her developed cooking instructions based on a 70’s kitchen.  Her goal was to plainly duplicate these exceptional tastes as closely as possible.

I have simplified several of her recipes even further; my versions utilize our modernized conveniences nearly fifty years hence.  Perrey of Peson, puree of pea soup, is my first inspiration.  The flavor here is much the same that our illustrious king experienced.  However I substituted dried peas for the shelling of fresh ones; thus, this distinctive soup is available year round.  Poetic license had me choose yellow peas instead of green.  Either will do.

The basic techniques for preparation in medieval times were much the same as today. There was paraboyling, bakying, stewying, scaldying, broyliying, tostying, fryeing, boilleing, and roosting.  However these manuscript recipes only document vague preparatory steps with the needed ingredients.  There were no quantities and not many details.  Below is an example: here you’ll find this soup’s receipt given in its entirety as taken from Sass’ book:

“Take peson and seeth hemsaft and cover hem til thei berst.  Thenne take up hem, and cole hem thorgh a cloth; take oynons, and mynce hem, and seeth hem in the same sew and oile therewith,; cast thereto sugar, salt, and saffron, and seeth hem wel thereafter, and serve hem forth.”

Indeed let us serve this forth!

A pot of perrey of peson soup

a pot of perrey of peson soup

Perry of Peson  Yields: 8 servings.  Total prep time: 1 hr & 20 min/  active prep time: 20 min/  cooking time: 1 hr.  This puree of pea soup is adapted from a manuscript recipe from Lorna Sass’  To the King’s Taste (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1975).

2 tbsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best; olive oil at high temperatures produces carcinogens.)

1 large yellow onion, chopped

2 cups dried yellow peas  (Available in bulk at Winco; may substitute dried green peas; I choose these yellow peas, though the manuscript recipe calls for fresh peas.)

2 quarts bone broth or 2 liter-boxes chicken broth (See recipe under Tortellini Soup, 2016/10/10, for easy, inexpensive bone broth.)

2 cups water

scant 1/4 tsp saffron threads  (Spanish saffron available inexpensively at Trader Joe’s.)

2 tbsp brown sugar, packed down in spoon  (May also use sucanat, evaporated cane juice, which is close to what they used in the 14th century.)

Season with Better Than Bouillon, a healthy chicken base  (Most grocery stores carry this.)

White pepper and salt, to taste  (Real Salt is best, available in health section at local supermarket.)

  1. Heat oil in a medium sauce pan, add onions, and sweat (cook until translucent).
  2. Add peas; stir to coat with oil.
  3. Add broth, water, and saffron; bring to a boil over medium temperature; reduce heat and simmer at a low boil for 1 hour, or until peas are very soft.  DO NOT ADD SALT WHILE COOKING, AS PEAS WON’T SOFTEN.
  4. Add brown sugar when peas are soft.
  5. Next season with a small amount of Better Than Bouillon; taste and add more slowly.  Add white pepper and, finally, salt to taste.  Add these last three items slowly, adjusting as you go, until desired taste is achieved.
  6. Take off heat and puree with a stick blender, also known as an immersion blender, available at Bed, Bath, and Beyond.
  7. Check seasonings again, serve hot.  Freezes really well also.  Explodes with flavor!

Tortellini Sausage Soup and Bone Broth

pot of tortellini soup

I first had this soup in the pleasing home of a beloved friend. Her husband was dying of cancer; I was there ministering to them and they to me, for she was letting me do my laundry, while I helped to cook and clean.  We also had a time of deep prayer, as we cried out for healing grace.

This friend’s other half died shortly thereafter.  His funeral was a celebration of goodness and life. It was my favorite funeral ever! God’s love was there. I, however, experienced a mingling of confusion admits the joy: why death?

I have since learned the answer at Abundant Life Family Church.  It is never our Father’s will that anyone die before fullness of age.  The Bible teaches us precisely how to avoid all ruin.  It warns us that we are destroyed by lack of knowledge.  Its careful directions educate us on how to avoid destruction, with exacting instructions for receiving abundant life as well.

Back then, my friends and I didn’t have enough wisdom to overcome death’s fierce attack.  Today I can say that I have the knowledge to overcome anything, in Jesus Christ’s name.  This is solely because of the truth taught from the Word of God at my church.  Now I am strong and can stand in the face of all adversity.  And I do just that!

My most prized wedding took place months after this favored funeral at my old church.  The size of this celebration of matrimony was extremely small, just a handful of attenders.  But God was present!  The Spirit spoke to my heart in every fine detail of this ceremony.  The vows spoken, the songs sung, the exquisite food, the fond fellowship were all an expression of the one true Word; they shouted vibrant blessing.

I experienced jubilee this day.  At the time, I thought there is redemption of the loss of my friend: a wealthy wedding followed the holy funeral.  Nevertheless this recovery was in mere seed-form, as all truth starts.

Now there is fullness of this hope.  I am no longer a victim of destruction, for I have authority over the enemy of my soul.  This I learned at Abundant Life Family Church. I invite you to browse the web and listen to teachings at alfc.net.

My friend instructed me how to make this tortellini soup six years ago amidst cleaning and laundry.  It nourished our bodies and souls than especially, as they were going through trauma. Here I have elaborated on this recipe, bringing yet more vitality.  The most important change is homemade bone broth.  How it generates length of days!

Bone broth is a power food.  Eight ounces of chicken stock has only one gram of protein, while bone broth has nine grams per cup!  Further, it impacts our health in numerous ways, such as by aiding digestion, overcoming food intolerances, boosting the immune system, improving joint pain, and reducing cellulite.

I encourage you to take advantage of leftover bones; save chicken carcasses, until you have three; then, make this super stock with the easy guidelines listed below. Bon appetit!

Tortellini soup

tortellini soup

Tortellini Sausage Soup  Yields: 2 quarts.  Total prep time: 1 hr/ active prep time: 30 min/ cooking time: 30 min.

2 tbsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best; olive oil is carcinogenic when heated to high temperatures.)

1 medium/large onion, chopped

1 large carrot, diagonally sliced a quarter-inch thick

1 stalk celery, sliced at a diagonal in small pieces

10-14 ounces Keilbasa sausage, or a natural sausage, sliced diagonally

scant 1/2 tsp Chinese Five Spice

scant 1/2 tsp dried crushed red pepper, or to taste

1 1/2 quarts bone broth, recipe below  (You may substitute 1-liter box of chicken broth plus 1-15 ounce can.)

6 ounces frozen spinach or kale  (Organic frozen kale is available in health section at our local Fred Meyer’s.)

1-15 ounce can  kidney beans, or beans of your choice, drained well  (Simple Truth organic beans are good and inexpensive; available at local Fred Meyer’s.)

1 cup dried cheese-filled or pesto-filled tortellini  (Available at Trader Joe’s.)

1 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is best; available in nutrition center of local supermarket.)

1 cup grated or shaved Parmesan cheese

  1. sweating onions

    Heat oil in a stock pot over medium heat; when a piece of onion sizzles in hot oil, add the rest and sweat, or cook until translucent (see photo).

  2. Add carrot, celery, and sausage; cook for a total of 8 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Blend in Chinese Five Spice and red pepper; cook 2 more minutes.
  4. Stir in broth and bring to a boil over medium heat.
  5. Mix in spinach or kale, tortellini, and beans; bring to a second boil; cook for 10 minutes, or until greens are limp and pasta is soft.
  6. Add salt; then, adjust seasonings to taste.
  7. Serve topped with Parmesan cheese.

Bone Broth  Yields: about 3 quarts.  Total prep time: your choice of 13-25 hrs/ active prep time: 30 min/ inactive prep time: 30 min/  cooking time: 12-24 hrs, longer cooking extracts more nutrients.  (Note: may be made ahead and frozen in quart-size containers.)

3 tbsp raw apple cider vinegar per chicken carcass, or 6 tbsp per turkey carcass (Raw cider vinegar is most cost efficient at Trader Joe’s.)

3 leftover chicken carcasses, or 1 large turkey carcass, broken in pieces  (May freeze until ready to use.)

2 large yellow onions, quartered

4 celery ribs with leaves, cleaned and chopped in 2 inch pieces

4 large carrots, cleaned, skin scraped off, and chopped in chunks

8 large cloves of garlic

  1. Fill an oven-proof stock pot one-third full of water, stir in vinegar, place poultry carcasses in water-may break the bones to fit compactly in pot.  Add more water to cover carcasses and stir well (you’ll need room in pot for the vegetables later).  Let sit 30 minutes (the vinegar draws out the nutrients from the bone marrow).
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  3. After 30 minutes, add onions, celery, carrots, and garlic to the pot; cover with water; bake 1 hour at 350 degrees.
  4. Turn temperature down to 300 degrees; cook for a total of 12 to 24 hours; longer periods produce more nutrition, though 12 hours is still quite good.
  5. Add more water periodically, keeping the bones covered; don’t, however, add any more water the last 6 hours of cooking (this will aid in reducing broth, for freezing compactly).
  6. Strain when done.  If needed, reduce to 3 quarts of liquid if using 3 chicken carcasses, or 2 quarts liquid per large turkey carcass.  Freezes beautifully!