1970’s Atomic Muffins

atomic muffins

My heart has always longed for ideal eating habits, though I haven’t always possessed the capacity for their required discipline.  Natural foods first came into my life in the early seventies, in my eccentric college town of Missoula, Montana.  It was there a friend taught me this powerful atomic muffin recipe.

Then I was attempting to nurture my body with the best; I looked great on the outside-118 compact pounds clothed in the best of vestures-but my insides were another story, for I had the hidden disease of bulimia, which was with me for a total of 3 years; half way through this, I briefly became anorexic and was admitted to Calgary, Alberta’s Foothills hospital, weighing 88 pounds on my mother’s scale.  There a rising physician, who was just breaking into this then unknown field, cared for me.

Eating disorders were rare at that time, though now they are commonplace.  My heart breaks for those that suffer thus, for I know firsthand their devastating grip.

During the years that followed this hospitalization, I went from an extreme 88 to a gross 226 pounds, before I surrendered and God brought complete healing to me: I now have a beautiful, healthy physique, and I eat sanely, with an ability to make balanced choices, having an innate strength to neither over- or under-consume.

This privilege grew progressively.  As a direct answer to an earnest cry for help, it initiated with my courageous act to turn from the bulimic darkness, on a crisp November day in 1978.

Back then, my jaws would hurt from daily, nonstop eating and purging; it was during this fiery torment that I sought the help of a Catholic priest, whom by chance I had heard was successfully recovering from alcoholism; thus, I trusted the hope, visible in his mastery of obsession, to spill over into my life.

My plans were to purge one last time before my 1 PM appointment, but I awoke to late to do so; hence, the first ominous hurdle presented itself, with my intense temptation to skip the meeting.  Something bigger than I, however, got me there.

With this glimmer of determination, I arrived at this parish, unknown to me, in a small neighboring town, only to suffer the second attempt to stop my breakthrough: the priest answering my knock informed me that his superior, the recovering alcoholic, was unavailable.  My instinct was to flee, but I blindly accepted his proffered services instead.

This man, whether knowingly or unknowingly, told me my bulimia wasn’t sin, but rather something beyond my control; he suggested that I stop doing it; at the same time he administered grace, saying that IF upon occasion I failed, I was to ask the Father for forgiveness, and immediately return to my new eating.  All this miraculously seemed doable, for the seed of faith had been established.

I will never forget leaving this sanctuary and walking out into the parking lot, where the asphalt seemed to dance with the reflection of God’s light, from Montana’s perpetual Big Sky.  Indeed my soul was dancing along with this lively, beautiful pavement; my new birth had begun!

At about three weeks into this profound freedom, a stark overwhelming urge to purge an excessive meal assailed me, in which there was actual physical weakness, as I staggered going back and forth toward a public bathroom.  This moment became a crucial step in proving my liberty, for it was then I decisively turned from death to life: clarity came with the vivid memories, both of the sweet peace experienced during this abstinence, as well as the subsequent pleasures derived from foods that I was now able to actually taste; there was vital victory as I successfully turned, moving to the place where  life and my friends were waiting.

It got much easier after that.  Only once in all these 50 years did I give into this lie, for I slipped into this old habit for a week, when I was desperately trying to loose a few pounds, before leaving for Paris in 1985; a greater than I brought me back to my senses, and I stopped as suddenly as I had started.  While in Dijon, France, after an exceptionally large meal, I was tested, however, to see if I really meant business.  Only by grace did I stand, not purging my grotesque meal.  Never again have I returned to this inferno; honestly, I am no longer even faintly tempted.

In this same way, though with much less drama, all my food consumption has been refined: first I receive inspiration for better habits, whether it be the exclusion of a given matter, or the addition of something new; next, I weigh and balance the suggestion, getting clear in my heart what is best for me; then, I initiate the change, which often comes with challenges at first.

I find that we are generally tested, when establishing all new behavior; such testing, however, provides proof of the pudding, for it fixes newly-won-rights indelibly.  Now I thank God, not for the attacks themselves (which aren’t of him), but for the rich strength provided in overcoming them, through our partnering with his grace.

Bless our food, bodies, and hearts always!

grinding flour with an attachment for a Kitchen Aid mixer

Atomic Muffins  Yields: 2 dozen.  Total prep time: 3/4 hr/  active prep time: 30 min/  baking time: 15 min (if you have 2 muffin pans).

1 c raisins, soaked in boiling water for 15 minutes

1/2 c oil  (Grape seed or avocado oils are best for heating to high temperatures, without producing carcinogens.)

3/4 c sugar  (Coconut sugar is ideal-see Zucchini Bread, 2017/07/24, for information on this sugar.)

2 tbsp molasses

2 lg eggs  (Organic free-range eggs are healthiest.)

1 c whole wheat pastry flour  (May grind 2/3 c organic soft winter white wheat berries to make a cup of fresh-ground flour.)

1/4 c barley or spelt flour

1 tsp salt  (Real Salt, pink salt, is so important for premium health; available in nutrition center at local supermarket.)

1/2 c powdered milk

1/2 c nutritional yeast  (Available in bulk at many stores, such as our local Winco.)

3/4 c wheat germ

1/2 c old fashioned rolled oats  (Organic in bulk is only slightly more expensive and much more nutritious.)

1/2 c sesame seeds

1/2 c sunflower seeds

3/4 c pumpkin seeds

1/2 c nuts, chopped

1 1/2 c milk  (May use an alternative milk, such as almond or hazelnut.)

Coconut Spray Oil  (Pam is available at most supermarkets; our local Winco brand, however, is far cheaper.)

  1. easy mixing of dry ingredients in a sealed storage bag

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

  2. If grinding fresh flour, do so now (see photo at top of recipe).
  3. Cover raisins with boiling water; set aside for 15 minutes, for them to plump up.
  4. In a large bowl, blend oil, sugar, and molasses; add eggs; beat well.
  5. In a gallon-size sealed storage bag, shake together all dry ingredients, including seeds and nuts, until well mixed (see photo above).
  6. Alternately blend dry ingredients and milk into oil mixture, using just half of each at a time, until all is incorporated.  (Note: if using fresh-ground flour, preferably let batter rest in bowl for 20 minutes before baking, as it is a coarser grind and doesn’t absorb the moisture as quickly as store-bought flour; see photo below.)
  7. bowl of batter

    Spray muffin pans with oil; spoon batter into cups; bake for 14 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean.  (It is best to lean on the side of under baking, so muffins remain moist.)

  8. Remove from pan and cool on waxed paper.
  9. Keep muffins in refrigerator; the freezer, however, provides even better storage, if using them over an extended period.
  10. These are indeed atomic in nutrition!

Sprouted Quinoa and Yam Salad

 

sprouted quinoa and yam salad

sprouted quinoa and yam salad

Sherry, my beloved friend from Montana, sent me this healthy recipe, which I improved on.  It literally sings in your mouth!

I learned about quinoa from a woman who healed terminal illnesses with food; she was on my sister’s prayer team many years ago.  People from all over the United States were going to Jeanette for her healing ministry with diet; thus, her culinary wisdom became a gold mine for my sister Maureen and me.  Many things that I now recommend originated with her.

We learned that sprouted quinoa was considered the number one power food on planet earth.  Eggs and quinoa are the only foods that have all the amino acids, thus making them a complete protein.

I was a vegetarian for six years in my twenties.  Back then, much of my knowledge for healthy eating came from the marvelous cookbook by Francis Moore Lappe, Diet for a Small Planet (New York: Ballantine Books, 1971).  These recipes utilized balanced combinations of plant foods and dairy; the combining of their differing amino acids complimented each other to make complete proteins.  For instance, its memorable Indian Pudding called for a balance of cornmeal, soy grits, milk, and eggs to form a strong protein; how I relished it hot, with rich vanilla ice cream melting around the edges-I still do.

I was quite skilled in cooking this way in the 1970’s.  Just prior to moving to Tokyo in the fall of 1981, however, I began eating meat once again.  My father gently reproved me for waiting until this move to do so, because beef was exorbitantly expensive in Japan, while being relatively cheap in America.  My thinking was that  I needed to be prepared for gracious Oriental hospitality.

Recently I made my friend Sherry’s simple recipe for quinoa and yam salad; nevertheless, I tweaked it.  Its food value is amplified by using what I learned from my sister’s prayer partner, the healer Jeanette.  Here I sprouted this ancient grain from Peru, which increases its food value dramatically.  Also I worked with the colors of the foods (color is real important); I incorporated red raspberries, purple sweet potato, and orange carrots.  Another important recommendation is the use of coconut or avocado oil, which is critical, as olive oil is a carcinogenic when heated to high temperatures.

This healthy salad is dynamite!  Make an abundance of it for leftovers.

Sprouted Quinoa and Yam Salad  Yields: 4 servings.  Total prep time 2 days (for sprouting quinoa)/  active prep time: 1 hr.

1 c quinoa, sprouted  (Sprouting directions are below; make 2 days ahead.)

1 tsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best; olive oil is carcinogenic when heated to high temperatures.)

1 med yellow onion,  cut in even 1/8-inch slices

1 1/2 c yams, peeled and cut in 5/8-inch cubes  (Organic purple sweet potatoes are ideal; sweet potatoes and yams are just differing names for the same vegetable; they are interchangeable.)

2 med carrots, cut in 5/8-inch cubes

2 stalks celery, cut in 5/8-inch cubes

4 lg garlic cloves, chopped fine  (For easy preparation, may use 2 frozen garlic cubes from Trader Joe’s.)

2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 tbsp Bragg’s Amino Acids  (Available in any health store.)

1 tbsp real maple syrup

3/4 tsp dried cumin

Spinach or lettuce leaves

Fresh raspberries or dried cranberries, for garnish

Agave-roasted nuts  (See recipe in ‘Healthy Green Salads’, 2016/08/15.)

  1. Soak quinoa in ample water for 8 hours; drain well and let sit for 1-2 days, rinsing about every 8-12 hours.  The sprouting is complete when legs are at least 1/4 inch long.  (The sprouting may be done in a special sprouting jar, a bowl, or on a tray-if your choice is a tray, use parchment paper both under and on top of the grain.)  Note: this process brings the enzymes alive and increases food value dramatically.  For more details on sprouting see wikihow.com/Sprout-Quinoa
  2. For saving sprouted quinoa, place it in a sealed storage bag or jar, and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.  Optional: if you are not ready to use the sprouts immediately, you may, with the use of clean parchment paper, spread them on a tray or large plate, to allow excess moisture to dry from sprouts (be sure not to rinse again before you start this drying process).  They should dry in about 12 hours; this aids in long-term storage.
  3. Heat oil in a large frying pan over med/low heat; add onion and caramelize, cook slowly until deep brown in color.  Stir every few minutes until onions begin sticking to bottom of pan and color just starts to turn; then, stir every minute, until dark brown.  For more detail on caramelizing onions, see Caramelized Onions and Carrots (2017/06/19).
  4. In the meantime, spray vegetables with an effective, safe solution (combine 97% distilled white vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide in a spray bottle); let sit for three minutes; rinse really well.  This kills parasites and cleanses inexpensively.
  5. Rather than peel carrots, scrape them with a sharp knife, to preserve vitamins just under the skin.  Peel yams.  Cut all vegetables into small, 5/8-inch cubes, set aside.
  6. Combine lemon juice, Braggs, maple syrup, and cumin in a large bowl; set aside.
  7. Add vegetables to hot caramelized onions; stir well to distribute oils.   Place 1/4 c water in with vegetables and cook covered, over medium heat,  for about 15 minutes, or until yams are tender, stirring occasionally.
  8. Blend fresh garlic into vegetable mixture; sauté only until you can smell the herb, about 20 seconds (if you are using frozen garlic, cook just until it thaws, stirring well).
  9. Place yam mixture and quinoa in bowl with salad dressing, mix well, chill several hours.
  10. Serve on a bed of lettuce or fresh spinach.
  11. Top with fruit and nuts.

19th Century French Lemon Meringues a la Ude

Meringues a la Ude

meringues a la Ude

This is the third and final post on my simple 19th century French dinner.  These tart, gluten-free meringues a la Ude are a summer delight!  They are easy to prepare, though it takes about one hour of light labor; a child can follow these care-free steps of preparation.

These lemon meringues are effortless, because it’s another recipe from Louis Eustache Ude’s The French Cook, 1813; the lemon filling, however, is mine.  Ude also created the easy, delightful chicken a l’oignon of this series (see 2016/07/04).

This man’s incredible mind conceived elegant foods with the simplest preparations. His extraordinary talent placed him in the illustrious palace of King Louis XVI, before the fall of the monarchy; after his escape in 1795, he taught England his secrets.

Teaching young Nat how to cook.

teaching young Nate how to make meringues

I discovered this privileged information in Esther B. Aresty’s The Delectable Past  (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1964).  This recipe is even easier for us today than it was for Ude’s followers, for we have the electric mixer to beat the egg whites!

Organic cane sugar works well for this receipt.  Nevertheless you may use regular refined cane sugar (C & H is a good brand.)

I tried to make the meringues with coconut sugar, which was a huge disaster. Sucanat, evaporated cane juice, doesn’t work either, as it is not fine enough to be incorporated in the beaten egg whites.  So stick with cane sugar, using either organic or regular.

19th century French costumeThis post includes a photo of my period costume for my 19th century French meals, which I wear when doing public events.  It is very beautiful, though it is quite bulky on me now, for I weighed 226 pounds when my costume designer fashioned it.

My Lord has healed my body and mind!  The result is a very voluminous dress on my small frame, which is joy unspeakable-health and more health!

 

Meringues a la Ude with Lemon Filling Adapted from a recipe in Esther B. Aresty’s The Delectable Past (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1964).  Yields: 1 dozen gluten-free meringues.  Total prep time: 1 3/4 hr/  active prep time: 1 hr/  baking time: 1 hr.

3 large egg whites (save 2 yolks for filling)

2 pinches salt

1 cup of sugar (Organic cane sugar is best; available in a 2 pound package at Trader Joe’s, or in a cheaper 10 pound bag at Costco.)

1/2 tsp lemon or orange extract, optional

  1. Preheat oven to 225 degrees.
  2. Separate egg whites in a large bowl (save 2 yolks).  Add salt and beat the whites until quite stiff, using an electric mixer.
  3. Add sugar very slowly-a scant teaspoon at a time-keeping the beaters going constantly.  As whites get really thick, after about 3/4 cup of sugar is added, increase additions to 2 tablespoons at a time.  When all the sugar is incorporated, continue to beat for several minutes.  Mix in optional extract.
  4. Cover a cookie sheet with parchment paper; spoon egg whites on the paper in small mounds, about 2 1/2 inches long, in the shape of an egg.
  5. Bake for about 60-70 minutes, or until golden brown and rather sturdy.
  6. While warm, gently cut an indentation in the meringue with a small sharp knife.  Scooping delicately with your finger, make a hollow in each.
  7. Set aside and cool completely.
  8. Fill each meringue with lemon filling just before serving.

Lemon Filling (about 3 cups, enough for a dozen meringues)

3 medium organic lemons  (Regular lemons will have taste of pesticides.)

1/4 cup cornstarch

1/4 cup sugar  (Organic cane sugar is best.)

1/4 tsp salt

2 cup cold water

2 large egg yolks

2 tbsp of butter

  1. Clean and zest lemons; juice and set aside.
  2. Mix cornstarch, sugar, and salt in a medium sauce pan.
  3. Add water; mix well with a wire whisk.
  4. Beat in egg yolks thoroughly.
  5. Bring to a boil over medium heat, whisking constantly; continue boiling for 1 minute more, or until thickened.
  6. Add butter, lemon zest, and juice; blend well with whisk.
  7. Remove from heat. Cool in refrigerator, covering the top of filling with a piece of plastic wrap, once cool.
  8. Spoon filling into meringues just before serving.
  9. Serve open face.  The tart, yellow lemon filling shouts summer’s blessings!