Natural Sausage with Zucchini and Eggplant

natural sausage with zucchini and eggplant

At this time of year, we are wondering what to do with all the zucchini.  Using natural sausage and Chinese eggplant, I transformed this ordinary vegetable, which is actually a fruit, into a memorable dish.  Garlic and Aidells’ Spicy Mango with Jalapeno Chicken Sausages give this common garden plant a dramatic bite, with a sweet aftertaste.  Eggplant is a perfect accompaniment to zucchini, and carmelized onions compliment all.  This is a simple, mouth-watering treat indeed.

My pastors are bringing their prolific zucchini to our services now, and I am thrilled. Our church body experiences this benefit every growing season.

Throughout the year, we experience the results of what this couple’s hands accomplish in the realm of the Spirit, but during harvest time we reap what these same faithful hands produce in natural soil.  Their charitable action is steadfast, and it can be concretely seen in the vegetables and fruits, with which they fed our physical bodies.

This particular squash reproduces rapidly; it can quickly grow beyond what is satisfactory.  When it gets over-sized, it contains too much water; its seeds are large and tough; there aren’t enough recipes to utilize this inundation.  (Learn more about its biology and history at Zucchini Bread, 2017/07/31.)

Our pastors watch this fruit/vegetable prudently; thus, readily picking it before it grows beyond its prime, whenever possible.  Our church is like a prototype of their healthy garden.  Pastors Monte and Dawn care for us like prized plants: watering with the word, observing diligently, pruning with exceptional wisdom and love…We are indeed well-tended.

I can’t express gratitude enough that our Lord saw fit to place me under their protection; it is here that I became equipped to fulfill my purpose as a food historian.  I invite you to access the bread of life at our website alfc.net

Meanwhile eat heartily, by cooking this delicious recipe.

Aidells’ Spicy Mango with Jalapeno Chicken Sausages

Natural Sausage with Zucchini and Eggplant  Yields: 4-5 servings.  Total active prep time: 45 min.

2 1/3 tbsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best; olive oil is carcinogenic when heated to high temperatures.)

1 medium yellow onion, cut evenly in 1/8 inch slices

12 ounces natural sausage, cut diagonally  (Aidells’ Spicy Mango with Jalapeno Chicken Sausages are the best here; available at most local supermarkets.)

1 lb Chinese eggplant, cut in 1/2 inch cubes  (See photo below.)

4 cloves of garlic, minced  (For convenience, use 2 frozen cubes of garlic from Trader Joe’s.)

1 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is important for health reasons; available in nutrition center at local grocery store.)

3/4 tsp freshly ground pepper, or to taste

chopping eggplant

2 carrots, thinly sliced at a diagonal

1 1/2 lbs of zucchini, cut in 1/2 inch cubes

  1. Clean vegetables, using an inexpensive, effective spray of 93% distilled white vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide; let sit 3 minutes.  Meanwhile go to next step.
  2. In a sauté pan, heat 1/2-1 tsp of oil; when a small piece of onion sizzles, add all onions and carmelize over medium/low heat, stirring every 2 minutes until color starts to form; then, stir every minute, until dark brown; when finished, deglaze pan with 2 tbsp or more of water (scrape the fond, or cooked-on juices, off the bottom of pan with a spatula); set aside when finished, adding to the bowl of meat described below.  Watch onions carefully, while performing the next steps.
  3. Rinse vegetables; cut them and meat, as described in the above list of ingredients; set all aside in separate bowls.  Mince garlic, if using fresh.
  4. finished product

    Heat 2 tsp of oil in another frying pan over medium heat.  When a piece of sausage sizzles in pan, add the other sausage slices and brown quickly, watching carefully as not to burn; place in a large bowl, carefully saving juices in the pan.

  5. When meat is removed, heat 2 tsp more of oil with the left-over juices, add eggplant, mix oil in well, and deglaze pan (scrape off fond left over by meat) with 2 tbsp or more of water.  Cook covered until soft, stirring every couple of minutes; deglaze pan again; transfer eggplant to the bowl of meat.
  6. Heat 2 tsp of oil in same pan; add carrots; cook for 3 minutes, or just until tender, stirring occasionally.  Mix zucchini into carrots; cook covered until limp, stirring several times.
  7. When vegetable is done, blend in garlic, salt and pepper; cook until you can smell the garlic.  (If using frozen, make sure it is melted and distributed well.)  Mix in meat, onions, and eggplant; adjust seasonings; heat thoroughly.  Serve with delight.

Carmelized Onions and Carrots

carmelized onions and carrots

Anything carmelized thrills our taste buds, for this cooking process brings out the sugars in foods, and our mouths savor sweetness.  Chef Gary Danko states it aptly: “Carmelization equals flavor.”1

Wikipedia defines this process as “the oxidation of sugar, a process used extensively in cooking for the resulting nutty flavor and brown color.”  It further defines it as a type of non-enzymatic browning reaction.

Foods which contain sugar lend themselves to this process; my recipe uses two such foods.  Carmelized onions are a blessed addition to my sautéed carrots, for the high sugar content of onions causes the above chemical reaction to easily occur.

Carrots also tend to carmelizes some, when cooked properly.  As far back as 1747, carrots were recognized as a sweet vegetable, for then the Prussian chemist Andreas Sigismund Marggraf discovered that they, as well as beets, contained small amounts of sugar.2

The presence of carrots in the Americas came directly or indirectly from Spain; their earliest appearance in these two continents dates back to 1543, when European vegetables were introduced into New Spain, to our south.  Our now common orange root subsequently found its way into North America; it was brought by English explorers, either coming up from these Spanish possessions mostly, or coming directly from England; there this vegetable had been established in the mid-sixteenth century by Flemish weavers, who were fleeing the persecution of Spain’s Phillip II.  Later in 1597, it was noted by English botanist John Gerard that carrots were also growing in Germany; their presence in the American hemispheres, however, came from the Spanish.3

multi-colored carrots

Joy of Cooking, copyrighted 1964, has a recipe for Carrots Vichy; this is a somewhat familiar recipe for thinly sliced carrots that are cooked, covered with a small amount of water (preferably water from Vichy, France), butter, and sugar.

Vichy is a spa and resort town in central France known since Roman times for its therapeutic springs.  During World War II, it was the home of the French State (Etat Francais), the seat of Nazi collaborationist government; it was chosen, because of its relative proximity to Paris (4.5 hours by train), it had the second largest hotel capacity at the time, and its modern telephone exchange, which made it possible to reach the world by phone.4

This town was also my home for four months during the fall of 1975!

Today we find carrots even in desserts.  We enjoy the familiar carrot cake in the West, while India knows halwa, or a fudge-like food made primarily with carrots, sugar, and milk.

My recipe is like a dessert, for it delights the child in us that loves that which is sweet.  Enjoy!

  1. Andrew Dorenburg and Karen Page, Culinary Artistry (Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1996), p. 42.
  2. James Trager, The Food Chronology (New York: Henry Holt and Company, Inc., 1995), p. 158.
  3. Ibid., pp. 94, 97, 107.
  4. https://en.wikipediea.org/wiki/Vichy

beginning stages of carmelization

Carmelized Onions and Carrots  Yields: 3-4 servings.  Total prep time: 55 min.

Note: if desired, make these carrots several hours in advance, reheat just before serving, or better yet, using two pans, make a double batch of carmelized onions well ahead, for they keep in refrigerator for three days (I have even frozen them).

4 1/2 tsp oil   (Avocado oil is best here for flavor and quality; coconut oil is also very good-these are the most healthy cooking oils, for olive oil is carcinogenic when heated to high temperatures.)

1/2 tsp butter

1 medium onion, halved at the root and stem, cut into 1/8 inch slices

6 extra-large carrots, or the equivalent  (Organic, multi-colored carrots are excellent and inexpensive at Trader Joe’s, see photo.)

4-5 medium/large cloves of garlic, minced  (May use 2 cubes of  frozen garlic; available at Trader Joe’s.)

1/2 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is important for optimum health; available in health section at most supermarkets.)

1/2 tsp fresh ground pepper, or to taste

  1. Be sure to cut onions in 1/8 inch slices, as thinner slices will burn easily.  Heat 1/2 tsp oil and 1/2 tsp butter in a large sauté pan over medium/low heat.  Do not crowd your pan with too many onions, or they will steam, producing water, and it will take longer to carmelize them. (Use two pans for a double batch.)  Keep heat at medium/low the approximate 45 minutes of cooking, or they will burn and/or dry out.  Be patient with cooking; don’t stop short of the perfect finished

    onions turning color during last 15 minutes

    product.

  2. Let cook for about 30 minutes, stirring every few minutes (see above photo for the beginning stage of carmelization).  While these are cooking, you may start carrots as directed in step 5; be sure, however, to stir onions regularly.
  3. Onions will start sticking to the pan at about 30 minutes; after this, stir every minute; the trick is to let them cook long enough to brown, but not burn.  May have to lower temperature and add a little more oil if they start to burn.  (See photo for color of onions starting to change during this last 15 minutes.)
  4. Onions will be deep brown in color when done (see bottom photo).  When cooking is complete, deglaze pan by adding water, stock, or wine; then, immediately scrape fond on bottom, using a wooden or plastic spatula made for high temperatures, incorporating these browned bits and carmelized juices into onions.
  5. Meanwhile scrape cleaned carrots with a sharp knife; this preserves the vitamins which are just under the skin, as opposed to peeling them.  Thinly and evenly slice them at a diagonal, set aside.
  6. If using fresh garlic, mince now, set aside.
  7. carmelized onions finished

    Heat 2 tsp oil in another large skillet over medium/high heat; when a piece of carrot added to pan sizzles strongly, or “jumps in the pan”, add half the carrots and distribute oil evenly.  Do not crowd pan, or carrots will steam rather than sauté; cook this vegetable in two batches.  Lower heat to medium immediately.

  8. Cook until carrots are soft, about 10 minutes, stirring somewhat frequently.  When carrots are cooked, deglaze pan by adding liquid (water, stock, wine, or balsamic vinegar); then, immediately loosen fond with a wooden or plastic cooking spatula; this adds incredible flavor.  Seat aside in a bowl and repeat steps 7-8 with remaining carrots.
  9. When carrots are cooked, stir into carmelized onions, which are finished.  Heat thoroughly.  Add garlic to hot mixture, cooking only until it smells pungent (or if using frozen garlic, cook only until it is dissolved and evenly distributed).  Do not burn garlic, for details on cooking garlic, see Tomato/Feta Chicken (2016/07/25).  Season with salt and pepper.
  10. May set aside and reheat just before serving.  Leftovers are great!