Avocado, Bean, and Corn Salad

avocado, bean, and corn salad

My church celebrated its 22nd anniversary this past summer with our annual picnic, which we always associate with incredible food; there are two men in our congregation that smoke tri-tip for this gala (they stay up all night smoking our Thanksgiving turkeys as well, which is by far the best turkey I have ever experienced).  This year our outdoor celebration also boasted of fried chicken, not to be outdone by everyone’s glorious side-dish contributions.

Church gatherings are famous for their magnificent spreads; our congregation is no exception, for we have a host of great cooks, even though our body is small; indeed, we eat well!

I always make the following bean salad for our anniversary; it is not only quick, but keeps well in the sun.  May you find this a great dish for potlucks also.

Normally I don’t use many canned goods in my food preparations; they, however, facilitate the ease of this excellent recipe.  The history of canning is of great interest to me.  It began with a Nicolas Appert, a creative Frenchman with ordained skills, promised attributes we all get to exercise.

Our genius started out as a brewer; then, became a steward for the aristocracy; finally, he ended up as a confectioner during the Napoleonic era.  When France and Britain were at war in 1795, Napoleon, seeking a way to best preserve food for his army, offered 12,000 francs to the winner of a contest for such a discovery.  As a confectioner, Appert’s mind had already been developing such a solution, for he had been pursuing the foremost means in lengthening the shelf-life of fruits, by improving on the traditional candying and drying processes.  This formal opportunity brought his ideas to fullness; thus, he won the prize with his method in which he preserved fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs, partridges, chestnuts, grape must, even the vegetable truffles: our originator partially cooked the foods, before placing them in wide-mouth bottles; then, by corking and boiling the bottles in a water bath, he expelled the damaging air; this technique of food preservation has remained in tact throughout the centuries. 1

Nevertheless, this hero unfortunately died a pauper, for by accepting the prize he lost the chance to patent his design.  (As an aside, I speak with the authority given me in Jesus Christ’s name: “Enemy of our souls, you can steal none of our rewards!”) 2

In 1810, Appert published a book detailing his canning procedure, which the award had prohibited him from patenting; just months later, a patent using his method for preserving foods surfaced in England.  There, however, his corked glass container became a more durable, tin-coated iron canister, which came with instructions for opening with a chisel and hammer. 3

By 1849, this technology for food preservation improved with machine-made, can tops and bottoms.  Prior to this, two skilled workers produced 120 cans a day; now two people could daily make 1500 cans, and these machine-operators were unskilled at that. 4

These tin cans inspired what was the slow advent of can openers, an invention that remained quite unsatisfactory from its first appearance in 1855, until our modern device appeared in the 1980’s; this latter, a side-opening implement, uses two wheels in tandem, one rotating, the other serrated, removing the lid, while leaving no sharp edges.  These days we take this relatively new, inexpensive tool for granted; as a result of the sped of modern technology, often even this is not required, for now many cans come with pop-tops. 5

Today can-making is a major economic force; in the United States alone, more than 130 billion cans are generated yearly, making this an eight billion dollar industry. 6  The majority-about four times more-of these canned goods are fizzy drinks, such as sodas and beer, rather than food. 7

Hardcore cooks can soak and boil dried beans for my salad; nevertheless most of us choose to thank Nicolas Appert, for his obedience to press in with his quick mind; as a result, we have canned beans and corn for this blessed recipe.

  1. Bee Wilson, Consider the Fork (New York: Basic Books, 2012), pp. 219-221.
  2. Ibid., p. 220.
  3. Ibid., p. 221.
  4. James Trager, The Food Chronology (New York: Henry Holt and Company, Inc., 1995), p. 242
  5. Bee Wilson, Consider the Fork (New York: Basic Books, 2012), pp. 221, 221.
  6. www.cancentral.com/can-stats/history-of-the-can
  7. Bee Wilson, Consider the Fork (New York: Basic Books, 2012) , p. 223.

assembling salad using garlic peeler

Avocado, Bean, and Corn Salad  Yields: about 1 1/2 quarts.  Total prep time: 25 min.  Note: this salad is spicy; for a milder version,  use less garlic and Jalapeno peppers; spiciness always lessens in intensity after a day of refrigeration; it is best to make this ahead for flavors to meld.

2-15 ounce cans of beans, drained  (Simple Truth Organic Tri-Bean Blend is ideal; available inexpensively at our local Fred Meyer-Kroger-stores.)

1-15 ounce can of sweet corn  (Trader Joe’s brand is excellent.)

1/2 cup chopped red or sweet onion  (For easy chopping, see step 2.)

5 large cloves of fresh garlic, or to taste, minced coarsely  (This amount provides a fair amount of bite; adjust for desired garlic flavor.)

chopping onion the easy way

2 Jalapeno peppers, or to taste, minced

1/2 cup salsa  (Trader Joe’s Salsa Autentica is ideal.)

1 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is important for health; available in health section at local supermarket.)

1/2 tsp fresh ground pepper, or to taste

2 small avocados, chopped

  1. Drain beans and corn in a colander, while proceeding to next step.
  2. For easy chopping, with root in tact, score a large onion with slices across top, cutting 2/3’s of the way down into it; turn onion and cut slices in opposite direction; shave pieces off end (see above photo); place in a large bowl.
  3. coarse grind of garlic

    For exceptional efficiency, peel garlic with a green, rubber garlic peeler from Bed, Bath, and Beyond (see this in photo at beginning of recipe).  May chop cloves coarsely with a sharp knife, or for quick preparation, place in a food processor, pressing pulse button repeatedly; stop and scrape down sides once; do not over chop, as a coarse grind adds bite to salad (see photo); place in bowl with onions.

  4. Cut Jalapeno peppers in half length-wise, scoop out seeds with a spoon, mince fine, and add to bowl (see photo below).  When finished, be sure to wash hands thoroughly before touching eyes.
  5. Stir salsa, salt, and pepper into onions/Jalapeno peppers.
  6. Gently blend beans and corn into this mixture; do not over mix, as this will make the beans mushy.  If making ahead, refrigerate at this point.
  7. mincing Jalapeno peppers

    Before serving, chop avocados, and carefully fold into bean mixture.  Serve with pleasure.

Tortellini Sausage Soup and Bone Broth

pot of tortellini soup

I first had this soup in the pleasing home of a beloved friend. Her husband was dying of cancer; I was there ministering to them and they to me, for she was letting me do my laundry, while I helped to cook and clean.  We also had a time of deep prayer, as we cried out for healing grace.

This friend’s other-half died shortly thereafter.  His funeral was a celebration of goodness and life. It was my favorite funeral ever! God’s love was there. I, however, experienced a mingling of confusion admits the joy: why death?

I have since learned the answer to this at Abundant Life Family Church.  It is never our Father’s will that anyone die before fullness of age.  The Bible teaches us precisely how to avoid all ruin; it warns us that we are destroyed by lack of knowledge.  Its careful directions educate us on how to avoid destruction, with exacting instructions for receiving abundant life as well.

Back then, my friends and I didn’t have enough wisdom to overcome death’s fierce attack.  Today I can say that I have the knowledge to overcome anything, in Jesus Christ’s name.  This is solely because of the truth taught from the Word of God at my church.  Now I am strong and can stand in the face of all adversity.  And I do just that!

My most prized wedding took place months after this favored funeral at my old church.  The size of this celebration of matrimony was extremely small, just a handful of attenders.  But God was present!  The Spirit spoke to my heart in every fine detail of this ceremony.  The vows spoken, the songs sung, the exquisite food, the fond fellowship were all an expression of the one true Word; they shouted vibrant blessing.

I experienced jubilee this day, for at the time, I thought there is redemption of the loss of my friend: a wealthy wedding followed the holy funeral.  Nevertheless this recovery was in mere seed-form, as all truth starts.

Now there is fullness of this hope.  I am no longer a victim of destruction, for I have authority over the enemy of my soul.  This I learned at my church; I invite you to listen to teachings at alfc.net.

My friend instructed me how to make this tortellini soup six years ago amidst cleaning and laundry.  It nourished our bodies and souls then especially, because of the trauma. Here I have elaborated on this recipe, bringing yet more vitality.  The most important change is homemade bone broth.  How it generates length of days!

Bone broth is a power food.  Eight ounces of chicken stock has only one gram of protein, while bone broth has nine grams per cup!  Further, it impacts our health in numerous ways, such as by aiding digestion, overcoming food intolerances, boosting the immune system, improving joint pain, and reducing cellulite.

I encourage you to take advantage of leftover bones; freeze chicken carcasses, until you have three; then, make this super stock with the easy guidelines listed below. Bon appetit!

Tortellini soup

tortellini soup

Tortellini Sausage Soup  Yields: 2 qt.  Total prep time: 1 hr/ active prep time: 30 min/ cooking time: 30 min.  Note: make bone broth ahead, or may substitute packaged chicken broth.

1 tbsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best; olive oil is carcinogenic when heated to high temperatures.)

1 med/large onion, chopped

1 lg carrot, cut diagonally in 1/4″ slices

1 stalk celery, sliced at a diagonal in small pieces

10-14 oz Keilbasa sausage, or a natural sausage, sliced diagonally

scant 1/2 tsp Chinese Five Spice

scant 1/2 tsp dried crushed red pepper, or to taste

1 1/2 qt bone broth, recipe below  (You may substitute 1-liter box of chicken broth plus 1-15 oz can.)

6 oz frozen spinach or kale  (Organic frozen kale is available in health section at our local Fred Meyer-Kroger-store.)

1-15 oz can  kidney beans, or beans of your choice  (Organic beans are only slightly more expensive.)

1 c dried, cheese or pesto-filled tortellini  (Available at Trader Joe’s.)

1 tsp salt, or to taste  (Himalayan, pink, or Real Salt is critical for optimum health; an inexpensive fine grind Himalayan salt is available at Costco.)

1 c grated or shaved Parmesan cheese

  1. sweating onions

    Heat oil in a stock pot over medium heat; when a piece of onion sizzles in hot oil, add the rest and sweat, or cook until translucent (see photo).

  2. Add carrot, celery, and sausage; cook for a total of 8 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Blend in Chinese Five Spice and red pepper; cook 2 more minutes.
  4. Stir in broth, cover, and bring to a boil over medium heat.
  5. Mix in spinach or kale, tortellini, and beans (not necessary to drain them); cover and bring to a second boil; uncover and cook for 10 minutes, or until greens are limp and pasta is soft.
  6. Add salt; then, adjust seasonings to taste.
  7. Serve topped with Parmesan cheese.

Bone Broth  Yields: about 3 qt.  Total prep time: your choice of 13-25 hrs/ active prep time: 30 min/ inactive prep time: 30 min/  cooking time: 12-24 hrs, longer cooking extracts more nutrients.  (Note: may be made ahead and frozen in quart-size containers.)

3 tbsp raw apple cider vinegar per chicken carcass, or 6 tbsp per turkey carcass (Raw cider vinegar is most cost efficient at Trader Joe’s.)

3 leftover chicken carcasses, or 1 lg turkey carcass, broken in pieces  (May freeze individual carcasses until ready to use.)

2 lg yellow onions, quartered

4 celery ribs with leaves, cleaned and chopped in 2″ pieces

4 lg carrots, cleaned, skin scraped off, and chopped in chunks

8 lg cloves of garlic

  1. Spray vegetables, except garlic, with a safe, inexpensive, effective vegetable spray made by combining 97% distilled white vinegar with 3% hydrogen peroxide.  Let sit for 3 minutes; then, rinse well.  Cut vegetables.
  2. Fill an oven-proof stock pot one-third full of water, stir in vinegar, place poultry carcasses and vegetables in water-break the bones to fit compactly in pot.  Add more water to cover carcasses and stir well.  Let sit 30 minutes (the vinegar draws out the nutrients from the bone marrow).
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  4. After 30 minutes, place pot in oven and bake 1 hour at 350 degrees.
  5. Turn temperature down to 300 degrees; cook for a total of 12 to 24 hours-longer periods produce more nutrition, though 12 hours is still quite good.
  6. Add more water periodically, keeping the bones covered; don’t, however, add any water the last 6 hours of cooking (this will aid in reducing broth, for freezing compactly).
  7. Strain when done.  If needed, reduce to 3 quarts of liquid if using 3 chicken carcasses, or 2 quarts liquid per large turkey carcass.  Freezes beautifully!

Carrots au Beurre

Carrots-au-beurre

carrots au beurre

This three-part 19th century dinner, which started last week, reflects the new Classic French cuisine.  This era in culinary history became popular as the Napoleonic age followed the French Revolution.  Then self-made men, following the example of Napoleon, rose in status and wealth.  They had to learn the ways of entertaining, or how to be amphitryons (hosts).

Cook books of the time reflected this non-aristocratic class’ needs, by giving such directions.  A forty-year lapse in the publication of cooking instructions, of any sort, existed prior to the beginning of this period.  One important recipe book, with the dawning of this new day, was Le Cuisinier, by A. Viard; it was published during the entire nineteenth century; its name, however, changed with each fresh political upheaval.

First printed in 1806, Le Cuisinier Imperial was named after the Emperor who loved classicism; Napoleon’s strong passion gave this new style of cooking its name Classic French cuisine.

The book’s title changed to Le Cuisinier Royal, when Louis XVIII became king in 1814.  Other name conversions reflected the politics of the century: it became Le Cuisinier National, at the time Louis Napoleon was elected President of the Republic; then, it went back to employing “Imperial”, when this man declared himself Emperor Napoleon III in 1852.  The cook book was known by Le Cuisinier National once again, when France became a republic in 1871; it has remained such; thus, this recipe for buttered carrots, taken from these pages, dates back two centuries.

In 1964, Esther Aresty documented the history of European and American cuisine in her account The Delectable Past, from which I got my above information. Here she improved on this delicious recipe from Le Cuisinier by pureeing this vegetable in a food mill.  I have augmented her outstanding method with easy, modernized, 21st century steps, utilizing a food processor.

You’ll be immensely pleased with this memorable dish; a comfort food of all comfort foods!

Carrots au Beurre  Adapted from a recipe in Esther B. Aresty’s  The Delectable Past (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1964).  Yields 4 servings.  Total prep time: 50 min./  active prep time: 20 min./  cooking time: 45 min.   Note: may make this the day before, as flavors are better the second day; double recipe for great leftovers.

½ cup pecan pieces

1 pound carrots  (Organic  carrots are very inexpensive.)

2 cups green beans  (Use either fresh or frozen;  excellent French-cut beans are available in Trader Joe’s freezer.)

1/4 cup whipping cream

2 tbsp butter

1 tsp fresh ground nutmeg, or to taste

1/2 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is best, available in health section of local supermarket.)

1/4 tsp pepper, or to taste

Butter or coconut spray  (Needed for oiling pan, if making ahead and refrigerating.)

  1. Preheat oven to 265 degrees. Roast pecans on a small cookie sheet for about 40 minutes, or until light brown, when piece is broken; set aside.
  2. Spray carrots with 97% distilled white vinegar mixed with 3% hydrogen peroxide, an inexpensive effective produce spray; let sit three minutes; rinse thoroughly; scrape with a sharp knife (scraping, as opposed to peeling, saves the vitamins which are just under the skin).  Cut into 1 inch pieces; if the carrot piece is thick, cut it in half.
  3. Cover cut vegetable with water in a medium saucepan, bring to a boil over medium/high heat, lower heat to medium, and cook until soft.
  4. Meantime steam green beans in a medium saucepan.  (If you are making carrots ahead, prepare green beans during last half hour of  the reheating of carrot dish in oven.)
  5. Place the hot, drained, soft carrots in a food processor; add cream, butter, nutmeg, salt, and pepper; blend until carrots are a smooth mixture, stopping once to scrape down sides.  Adjust seasonings to taste.  (IF preparing ahead, butter a baking dish large enough to hold recipe; then, place pureed vegetable in it; cover well with tin foil; refrigerate; reheat in 350 degree oven 1 1/2 hours before serving.)
  6. Place hot pureed carrots in the center of a vegetable platter, surround with green beans, and top with roasted pecans.