Spicy Sausage with Tomatoes and Turnips

spicy sausage with tomatoes and turnips

Nothing pleases the palate as much as tomatoes fresh from the garden; how I love this time of year, as it explodes with their bounty; nevertheless, at times the question is what to do with them all.  When faced with this dilemma recently, I mixed this fruit with turnips and my favorite Aidells Spicy Mango with Jalapeno Chicken Sausages, both of which I had on hand; thus, this relatively quick and easy recipe evolved; enjoy.  (For another delicious Aidells sausage recipe, see Sausage with Zucchini and Eggplant, 2017/08/04.)

We think Italian cuisine, when tomatoes are mentioned, as we readily do with references to sweet and hot peppers, eggplant, potatoes, turkeys, and corn (in particular polenta); none of these foods, however, were present as part of this country’s heritage, until after the discovery of America.

The tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, along with its relatives the potato, chilli, and tobacco, are part of the nighingshade family; tomatoes were domesticated first in Mexico, long before Christopher Columbus’ arrival here.

In 1519, twenty-seven years after Columbus’ first voyage, this fruit was officially discovered in Mayan towns by Spanish adventurer Hernando Cortes.  In 1527, conquistadors brought it back to Spain, along with the avocado and papaya.  Nearly three decades hence, in 1554, an Italian chronicle listed the first identifiable description of this yellow cherry tomato as pomo d’oro (golden apple).  By the end of the 16th century, both red and yellow tomatoes were present in European gardens, but only as exotic ornamental plants; there was a long period in which great suspicion was attached to them throughout this continent, due to their close resemblance to a deadly nightingshade.  Circumstances of the French Revolution, however, established them as an acceptable food.

Outside of America, Italy was first to heartily incorporate this fruit in its food preparation; inadvertently it became a leader in this adaptation.  The story unfolds with the French region Provence, whose cuisine was closely related to its Italian neighbor; these men from Provence formed the Marseillaise legion during the French Revolution.  Being richly exposed to Italian cooking, these soldiers had adopted the Italian “love apple”, as it was called, for it was considered an aphrodisiac.  In turn, this Marseillaise legion introduced this treasure to the Parisian troops, who took it back to their great city; thus, skepticism concerning tomatoes ceased in Paris; acceptance followed throughout Europe; and subsequently the whole world.

The week after next, I will post a Spanish recipe Ropa Vieja, from a 19th century American cook book; this is an omelette using our prized tomatoes and leftover meat; it doesn’t get any simpler, but oh so taste-provoking!

References:

Ilaria Gozzini Giacosa, A Taste of Ancient Rome (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1994), p. 11.

Harold McGee, On Food and Cooking (New York: Scribner, 1984, 2004), p.329.

James Trager, The Food Chronology (New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1995), pp. 86, 88, 96, 97.

Esther B. Aresty, The Delectable Past (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1964), pp. 129-130.

Spicy Sausage with Tomatoes and Turnips  Yields 4-6 servings.  Total prep time: 1 hr.  Note: leftovers taste even better, as flavors meld.

5 1/2 tsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best; olive oil is carcinogenic when heated to high temperatures.)

1 medium yellow onion, cut in even 1/8 inch slices

12 ounces Aidells Spicy Mango with Jalapeno Chicken Sausages  (May use any hot sausage of your choice, though this particular Aidells sausage is ideal; available at many supermarkets, including our local Winco and Fred Meyer-Kroger-stores.)

preparing turnips

1 pound turnips, cut in small 1/2 inch dice

1 1/4 pound fresh tomatoes, chopped

3/4 tsp dried oregano  (Trader Joe’s has an excellent organic dried oregano for $1.99!)

1 tsp dried basil  (Also available reasonably at Trader’s.)

1 tsp salt  (Real Salt is important for health; available in the nutrition center at local supermarket.)

1 tsp fresh ground pepper

cooking turnips

Avocado slices  (These are high in potassium and other powerful nutrients.)

  1. Spay vegetables with an effective, inexpensive spray (combine 97% distilled white vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide); let rest for 3 minutes; rinse really well.
  2. To caramelize onions, melt 1/2 teaspoon oil in a sauté pan over medium heat; when a piece of onion sizzles in pan, lower heat to medium/low; add rest of onions (do not crowd or they will sweat, taking much longer to caramelize). Stir every several minutes, until they began to change color; then, stir every minute, until dark brown; set aside.  Watch carefully while proceeding to next steps.
  3. In another frying pan, heat 2 teaspoon oil over medium heat; when small piece of sausage sizzles in pan, add the rest; cook quickly until browned, watching closely so as not to burn; place in a bowl, carefully saving juices in pan.
  4. Deglaze hot pan with 2 or more tablespoons of water (scrape fond, cooked-on juices, off bottom); set aside.
  5. Peel turnips, dice in small 1/2 inch cubes, place in a large bowl, see photo in list of ingredients.
  6. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in above pan, with juices, over medium heat. When a piece of turnip sizzles, stir in the rest, coating well with oils.  Cook covered until soft, about 10 minutes; stir every few minutes, deglazing pan each time you stir, by adding 2-4 tablespoon of water; this additional water will steam the turnips; see above photo.  (Be sure to cover while cooking.)
  7. cooking tomatoes

    Meanwhile chop tomatoes; set aside in a bowl.

  8. Mix tomatoes into soft turnips; sauté uncovered, over medium heat, until they are cooked down-about 15 minutes-at which time a chunky sauce will be formed (see photo). When tomatoes initially begin cooking, stir in oregano, basil, salt, and pepper.  (Be sure to cook uncovered.)
  9. Mix in sausage and onions after a somewhat-thick sauce has formed, having chunks of tomato in it; adjust seasonings (see photo).
  10. finished product

    Serve topped with avocado slices, for added health benefits.

Quick and Delicious Leek Soup

bowl of leek soup

The history of leeks is colorful. They have been cultivated both in Europe and Central Asia for thousands of years; they are considered to be native to the latter and the Mediterranean, though historical texts from other areas mention them as well. There are Biblical accounts of their presence in Egypt, in northeastern Africa, during early world history: when times got tough in the wilderness, the children of Israel longed for this delicacy, to the point that they were willing to return to their captivity under Pharaoh; archaeological digs support the presence of leeks in the Egyptian diet for the past 4 millennia.

Shortly after Christ’s presence on earth, during the first century A.D., the Roman Emperor Nero consumed them daily, for he adhered to their healing power in strengthening one’s singing voice.  Greek philosopher Aristotle concurred with this commonly accepted belief in ancient times, for he attributed the clear voice of the partridge to its diet consisting of this vegetable.

As the Roman Empire spread, its soldiers allegedly brought this choice food to the tables of the United Kingdom, where its popularity grew greatly.  As far back as the 6th century A.D., according to legend, Welsh soldiers were wearing a leek in their helmets for identification purposes, a tradition that was carried on in subsequent centuries.  Shakespeare, whom I studied in London in 1974, refers to this Welsh passion in Henry V.  Such enthusiasm continues in Wales in present times, for this member of the onion family is now its national emblem, along with the daffodil.

My first encounter with this Allium occurred in the 1980’s in Billings, Montana, when an Irish friend taught me how to make leek soup, as part of a complete Irish meal.  I had need to know how to cook this national cuisine authentically, for I had contributed a catered St. Patrick’s Day dinner to a fundraiser’s auction, which the local radio station had promoted well; thus, I had ten eager winners expecting the best.  My friend, whose roots were in Ireland, put his heart into equipping me for this fun event; he even made a huge Irish flag, which I still possess.

Leek soup is prevalent in many different nationalities; I serve a Potage Bonne Femme, a potato and leek soup, in a 19th century French banquet from my repertoire.  My present version, however, is superior.  For more recipes and information on leeks go to  Zucchini Chicken with Leeks and Shallots (2017/08/28) and Kale, Leeks, and Chicken (2017/09/04).

Enjoy this fast soup recipe both now and for years to come; it is that good.

References:

https://draxe.com/leeks/

http://foodfacts.mercola.com/leeks.html

http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/Historyof Wales/TheLeek-National-emblem-of-the-Welsh

www.wales-calling.com/culture/leeks-and-daffodil.htm

trimming leeks

Leek Soup  Yields: 2 quarts.  Total prep time: 1 hr.

3 leeks, white and light green part, 2/3 pound trimmed

1 medium/large yellow onion, chopped small

2 celery ribs, in small dice  (If desired, may omit the celery and double the potatoes, or vice versa double the celery, omitting the potatoes, to be diabetic friendly.)

7 tbsp butter, preferably unsalted  (If using only celery, 9 tbsp butter will be needed.)

2 small Yukon potatoes, 2/3 pound, peeled and chopped in 1/2 inch cubes

4 cups chicken broth  (Bone broth is best for food value; see Tortellini Soup, 2016/10/10.)

1/2 cup water

1 bay leaf

1 tsp salt, or to taste  (Real Salt is important for optimum health; available in nutrition center at local supermarket.)

1/2 tsp white pepper, or to taste

1/4 tsp nutmeg, or to taste  (Fresh ground is best.)

1/2 bunch-1/2 cup chopped-Italian flat parsley  (Organic is only slightly more expensive and much healthier.)

2 tbsp flour

1 cup whipping cream

1 tsp Better than Bouillon soup base, or to taste  (Chicken flavor is best, but vegetable flavor will also do.)

  1. Spray all vegetables, including parsley, with a vegetable spray (a mixture of 97% distilled white vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide is effective and inexpensive); let sit for 3 minutes; rinse well.
  2. rinsing chopped leeks

    Remove dark green top off leeks, leaving the white and light green part.  With the root in tact, cut leek in half lengthwise (see above photo); fan out under running water to remove dirt.  Holding the two halves together, cut each leek in 1/4-inch-thick slices; place pieces in a large container; rinse well with water, stirring with hand (see photo); drain in a colander.

  3. Chop onion, set aside.
  4. Melt 1/4 cup butter in a large stock pot over medium heat; chop the celery in small 1/4 inch dice; watch butter so as not to burn.  (Use 6 tablespoons of butter, if doubling the celery, by omitting the potatoes.)
  5. Add leeks, onion, and celery to melted butter, distributing it well throughout vegetables; cook covered for about 12 minutes, stirring frequently, so they don’t brown (this will sweat the onions and leeks, or turn them translucent).
  6. Peel and cut potatoes in small 1/2 inch pieces, placing them in a bowl of water to keep them from turning color.
  7. When leeks and onions are translucent, add drained potatoes, broth, 1/2 cup water, bay leaf, salt, pepper, and nutmeg to pot.
  8. making roux

    Cover and bring to a boil over medium/high heat; lower heat and simmer, partially covered, for about 20 minutes, or until potatoes are soft; stir occasionally

  9. Wash parsley, remove stems, chop, and set aside
  10. Make a roux by melting 3 tablespoons butter in a small saucepan over medium heat; blend in 2 tablespoon of flour with a wire whisk; cook until golden brown, mixing continuously (see photo).
  11. When potatoes are soft, whisk 1 cup of soup broth into pan of roux; add a second cup of broth, blending thoroughly; this mixture will be quite thick.
  12. Add parsley, cream, and roux to soup in stock pot.  Mix in a teaspoon of Better than Bouillon, to heighten taste; adjust seasonings; simmer for another 5 minutes (see photo of finished product).
  13. finished product

    Serve hot and enjoy!  (Flavors meld best after sitting for a day.)

Kale, Leeks, and Chicken

kale, leeks, and chicken

A friend from my church has a very large garden; sharing its bounty is her joy.  Last summer’s series on simplified kale receipts was inspired by her gracious contributions (see 2016/09/07 & 2016/09/19).

My mind creates recipes according to what is in my larder, which usually boasts of provision supplied by church members.  Lately Goldie has been bringing her organic kale again, as well as leeks and celery; this mouth-watering chicken dish resulted.

For a wedding present last year, I gave a marriage supper, complete with a cooking class, to newlyweds in our congregation (see Thai Coconut Lime Flounder, 2016/12/05); my desire was to release the gift of excellent nutrition in them.  Several weeks ago, we celebrated their holy matrimony again, with a new set of instructions and dinner following, rejoicing over God’s goodness in our lives.

Dina exhibited such courage in overcoming her unfamiliarity with food preparation, the first time I coached her; hope, however, grew this recent session, for she has grown exponentially in her eager steadfastness in the kitchen.

This new teaching included my chicken dish using the kale, shallots, and leeks from our church; these steps are straightforward, though they are time-consuming, with the preparation of leeks and kale.  But oh the benefits of health and taste!

Leeks are one of the world’s oldest vegetables, which are more delicate in flavor than either onions or shallots; they are considered highly nutritious, with cancer fighting attributes, as well as antiseptic, laxative, and diuretic properties, among many other health-promoting values.  This vegetable is particularly strong in vitamins K and A (when eaten raw, one 3.5-ounce serving contains 52 % daily requirement of vitamin K and more than 29% that of vitamin A).  Though research on this particular Allium is hitherto limited, it can well be assumed that its health benefits are comparable to those proven in its closely related onion and garlic cousins.  Its notable amount of flavonol kaempferol, in its substantial polyphenol content, thereby combats many health problems related to oxidative stress and chronic low-level inflammation; among these are rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, and type 2 diabetes; thus, this recipe is beneficial to Dina, whose husband is presently overcoming diabetes.  For an additional recipe and more on its history, go to Zucchini Chicken with Leeks and Shallots (2017/09/28).

Enjoy making today’s clear, detailed chicken recipe for leeks, shallots, and kale; my next entry will expound on the colorful history of leeks, with a delectable soup (2017/09/18).  Note: I will be taking this coming week off due to our Women’s Advance-we always advance, we never retreat, at Abundant Life Family Church (alfc.net)!

References:

www.foodfacts.mercola.com/leeks.html

www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=26

www.historic-uk.com/HistoryofWales/TheLeek-National-emblem-of-the-Welsh/

finished product

Kale, Leeks, and Chicken  Yields: 5-6 servings.  Total prep time: 1 1/2 hr (lengthy, but well worth it with these simple, detailed directions).

1 1/2 pound chicken tenderloins, about 8-10 large pieces  (Natural is best; available reasonably in Trader Joe’s freezer.)

2 large carrots, optional

3 large stalks of celery

1-1 1/2 pounds of kale

chopping leeks

4 leeks, white and light green part, 3/4 pound trimmed  (The best leeks are fresh-not more than a week old-and 1 1/2 inches in diameter.)

5 large cloves of garlic, minced  (3 cubes of frozen garlic from Trader Joe’s is much easier.)

4 tbsp butter

8 tsp oil  (Coconut or avocado oil is best, as olive oil is carcinogenic, when heated to high temperatures.)

1-2 tbsp fresh thyme, removed from stems, and coarsely chopped

Salt  (Real Salt is important for your health; available in the natural foods section at your local supermarket.)

Fresh ground pepper

  1. Place chicken in a large bowl of warm water to thaw, set aside.
  2. Spray all vegetables with an inexpensive effective spray, by combining 97% white distilled vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide; let sit 3 minutes; while waiting, if using fresh, mince garlic; rinse sprayed vegetables in a sink full of water several times.
  3. Cut celery diagonally in 1 inch pieces; scrape optional carrots with a sharp knife (this preserves vitamins just under the skin); slice thinly at a diagonal; set aside together in a bowl.
  4. Prepare leeks by first discarding outer leaves; cut off the dark green at the top and root hairs on bottom, leaving the white and light green part.  Cut each leek in half lengthwise; rinse well; then, cut each half in 2 inch pieces, by placing leek cut-side up on board; finally, slice these 2 inch lengths, cut-side up on board,

    cutting ribs out of kale

    into thin strips (see photo above); place pieces in a large container.  For final cleaning, rinse strips well with water, stirring with hand; then, drain in a colander.  This is known as the chiffonade-cut.

  5. Melt butter over medium heat in a sauté pan; as soon as a small piece sizzles in pan, add half the leeks, coating strips well with the hot butter. Reduce heat to low; cook down in pan, to make room for the rest of leeks, distributing oils well with each addition.  When all leeks are in pan, add garlic and slowly cook, covered, over low heat, stirring occasionally.
  6. straight-edge blade of food processor for chopping

    Cut ribs out of kale with a sharp knife (see above photo). May chop by hand, or quickly chop greens mechanically, by using the straight-edge blade of a food processor (see photo); turn processor on and place kale pieces in feeder tube (see photo below); set aside.

  7. Place thawed chicken on paper towel, salt and pepper GENEROUSLY.  Heat 1 tbsp of oil in a large frying pan over medium heat; when a small piece of chicken sizzles in oil, add the rest of the tenderloins; cook until light pink inside (do not overcook, as these will cook more later); cut tenderloins in bite-size pieces, removing them to a large bowl.  CAREFULLY SAVE JUICES IN PAN.
  8. Add 1 tablespoon of oil to these juices; mix in half the kale, distributing oils evenly.  Over medium heat, cook this vegetable down until there is room to add more; mix in oils with each addition, until all is in the pan; cook covered, until limp, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.  As needed, deglaze pan (scrape fond, cooked-on juices, off bottom with a spatula, after adding 2 or more tablespoons of water).  Remove to bowl of meat when done.
  9. placing kale in feeder tube of processor

    Meanwhile gently peel thyme off stems, chop coarsely with a sharp knife, set aside.

  10. Put last 2 teaspoons of oil in hot pan after kale is removed; add carrots and celery; mix well; cook until tender, stirring every couple of minutes.  Meantime go to next step.
  11. Blend 1-2 tablespoons chopped thyme, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper into leeks; stir in chicken/kale; continue cooking over low heat, until all is hot.  Add this mixture to pan of celery, when tender; adjust seasonings; one final time, scrape bottom to deglaze pan, using the juices from the added leek mixture.  Serve with confidence!