Rosemary Eggs

rosemary eggs

I am creating recipes for an abundance of fresh rosemary, which I am receiving right now; this delicious, simple egg receipt is among them; it reminds me that I eat like a queen.

Six years ago my young friend Noah began raising ducks, which he cherishes as if they were his children; each possesses its own personality and carefully chosen name.

Depending on the breed, ducks produce between 150-200 eggs a year, which come in all sorts of colors, varying mostly by genetic strain; different colored eggs, however, sometimes occur within the same breed.

Noah has seventeen of these domesticated aquatic birds, with only five of them producing presently; they only lay from early spring until the winter cold sets in; we are always sad when their production stops.

For the past half decade, I have been a beneficiary of this treasured delicacy; consequently my baking has excelled.  Pastry chefs prize these ovum of the family Anatidae over chicken eggs, for they contain less water, have firmer whites, and a higher fat content; this makes for moister cakes, breads, and cookies, which also rise better, due to the additional leavening power found here.

The right balance in the interaction between eggs, flour, sugar, and fat in baked goods is important; your product will be dry if there is either too much or too little of the crucial egg.  In most recipes, “eggs” is a reference to large-sized chicken eggs, of which the equivalent of three is a half cup of duck eggs; therefore, I always measure these for an accurate agreement in any given recipe.  Note: whipping duck whites takes longer because of their firmness; thus, the recommendation is to beat them at room temperature, adding a little lemon juice; older eggs are preferable to fresh, as they aren’t as firm.

Duck eggs are up to 50% larger than those of their chicken cousins, with more yolk than white; they are higher in protein and creamier, making great omelettes and quiches; crème brulee is unforgettable when made with these!  Nevertheless, my favorite way to eat them is over-easy, with the rich, smooth, orange yolk dripping all over the plate, which I sop up with my homemade toast.  In any case, be sure to not overcook them, as this makes them rubbery.

Exponents of eggs propound that, among many benefits, they help prevent breast cancer, because of their high choline content; their abundance of the antioxidants lutein and zeaxathin fights mascular degeneration and cataracts; their beneficial blend of omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, B vitamins, and iodine feeds your brain, thus enhancing your mood.  They are an ideal low-caloric, muscle-producing protein.

USDA has the same regulations for chicken, duck, quail, and ostrich eggs.  Their farmers and fans proclaim that duck eggs are less susceptible to diseases and parasites, making them safer, as well as healthier with a higher concentration of nutrients.  It is believed that their thick shells give them a longer shelf life than chicken eggs.

Eggs in general have gotten a bad rap in recent years; many feel they contribute to heart disease.  This is far from the truth, as they contain mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which actually lower heart disease risk.  Harvard health experts say healthy people can eat an egg a day; others believe you can eat even more.

These special duck eggs are popular in Asian cuisines, especially Chinese and Vietnamese, where they are frequently cured in brine; this draws out moisture and preserves them, altering their texture.  I fell in love with these pickled eggs while living in Tokyo!

My facile receipt, enhancing this powerful food with rosemary, blesses; if possible, use these superior duck eggs, available at local farms and upscale grocers, where they range from $6 to $12 a dozen.  My young friend, however, sells his for the lesser price of $6.  (Noah resides near the Tualatin high school here in Oregon; go to Cynthia Powell link on my Facebook page.)

References:

www.rodalesorganiclife.com/food/chicken-eggs-vs-duck-eggs-which-is-healthier

www.hgtv.com/outdoors/gardens/animals-and-wildlife/duck-eggs-411

https://www.tyrantfarms.com/5-things-you-didn’t-know-about-duck-eggs

https://pastrychefonline.com/2015/03/14/how-do-eggs-function-in-baking/

www.modernfarmer.com/2015/06/everything-you-need-to-know-about-duck-eggs/

chopping rosemary with a sharp knife

Rosemary Eggs  Yields: 1 serving (may multiply this, using a large non-stick pan).  Total prep time: 15 min.

1 tsp fresh rosemary, minced  (1 1/3 tsp will be needed, if using duck eggs, which are considerably bigger.)

1 small tomato, chopped

2 large chicken eggs  (May substitute duck eggs.)

1 tsp butter

Salt, to taste  (Real Salt is important for health reasons; available in nutrition center at local supermarket.)

Fresh ground pepper, to taste

  1. cooking liquid out of tomatoes

    Chop rosemary fine with a sharp knife; set aside (see above photo).

  2. Chop tomato and place in a dish.
  3. Beat eggs in a bowl, set aside.
  4. In a small non-stick omelette pan, heat butter over moderate/medium heat; add rosemary; and cook for about 20 seconds.  Stir in tomato and cook for 2-3 minutes.  There will be juice from the tomatoes at first (see photo); cook until most of this liquid is evaporated.
  5. Pour in eggs, salt and pepper the top.  Gently fold in the firm egg on the bottom of pan (see photo); cook until egg is not runny any longer, but still quite moist.  Do not overcook, as this makes duck eggs, in particular, rubbery and dry.
  6. folding in cooked egg

    Serve hot, with homemade zucchini bread (2017/07/24), or better yet my rosemary bread toasted, which I will publish in several weeks.

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